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French "inquiry" on feeding PEOPLE horse-meat
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TOPIC: French "inquiry" on feeding PEOPLE horse-meat
#21966
French "inquiry" on feeding PEOPLE horse-meat 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 263
About a year or so ago, I made a bit of a fuss about what was (as usual) a "minor fuss" from our population of apathetic drones: the use of "pink slime" as an additive in many Western "meat products" -- i.e. the packaged, raw meat we buy every day in our supermarkets (thinking we are buying "purely" meat).

The Meat-Packing Oligarchs reacted in outrage to use of the term "pink slime". It is only "meat glue" they insisted. Ah!!! Well that makes everything OK then. The Apathetic Drones could get back to eating their "meat products" with "meat glue" -- because the Meat-Packing Oligarchs "promised" to use a little bit less of it in the future.

Note that this is merely one anecdote in a never-ending process to reduce the QUALITY and (above-all) the COST of the "feed" which the Oligarchs allow their "human cattle" (i.e. us) to consume.

Most of our "poultry products" are created in chicken concentration-camps; where the chickens are packed so tightly together in such grossly unsanitary conditions that they only way they can prevent our "food" from being wiped out by plagues of poultry-disease is by dosing them with such extreme concentrations of antibiotics that these "food products" are barely safe (over the SHORT TERM) for consumption.

Thanks to "globalization"; more and more of our food is coming from (literally) every corner of the world -- from nations with INDIVIDUAL standards of food-monitoring which vary from polar extremes.

Now, as we see with respect to the INTERNATIONAL monitoring of these food-imports; standards are so lax that people in France have been eating HORSE -- i.e. dog food -- (thinking they were buying "beef") for who-knows-how-long.

Immediately France's "Socialist" government took a pause from its Muslim genocide campaign in Mali to immediately announce an "inquiry" into this outrage. Does this show how "deeply concerned" the government is about the quality of food fed to the French cattle??



Of course not. Rather, just as with the Wall Street frauds which erupt into view on a daily basis; the government wants to "put out the fire" (i.e. covers things up) as quickly as possible. And the best way to do that is to announce an "inquiry".

a) It makes it appear the government is "doing something".
b) It allows the government to temporarily SHELVE the subject as the "inquiry" is assembled and then pulls out its whitewash.
c) This stalling-time then allows the government (and the Oligarchs behind them) to plan their cover-up strategy and array their Web of Lies.

And the (real) GOAL of this strategy is to ensure that the French Drones go back to sleep; happily continue to munch on their meat products; and never LOOK AT THE LABELS to consider where these "meat products" are coming from.

Because the LAST thing the Oligarchs want to see after going to all this time-and-effort to ram "globalization" (and "deregulation") down our throats is for us to REJECT the pink slime in our DOMESTIC "meat products", and the DOG FOOD they import for our consumption from the 'four corners' of the world.





France Orders Inquiry on Use of Horse Meat, Readies Legal Action

www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-09/france...es-legal-action.html

French Consumer Minister Benoit Hamon said he ordered an inquiry into the use of horse meat in Findus Group Ltd. products and that the government is ready to press charges that could lead to imprisonment in the case.

So far the inquiry has determined that the supplier of a Luxembourg factory was France’s Poujol group, which bought frozen meat from a Cypriot trader, who had sub-contracted the order to a trader in the Netherlands, Hamon said in an e-mailed statement. The Dutch trader bought the meat from Romania.

“The operation was run above all on financial logic that brought in more than 300,000 euros ($400,650),” Hamon said.

The French government plans to prosecute if necessary under laws that can lead to half the profits being confiscated, or, in the case of fraud, lead to two years in prison and 37,500 euros in fines, Hamon said. The results of the inquiry will be made available by the middle of next week.

The French action comes after the U.K. Food Standards Agency gave food makers a week to test all their beef products after a range of lasagnas produced by Findus Group Ltd. was found to contain more than 60 percent horse meat.

The agency also said it involved the police in the U.K. and Europe as evidence of horse meat in burgers and lasagna “points to either gross negligence or deliberate contamination in the food chain,” according to a statement on its website today.

U.K. supermarkets including Tesco Plc, Wal-Mart Stores Inc.’s Asda and Aldi have removed some ranges of frozen beef burgers from their shelves in the past month as concern has escalated over tainted meat. Tesco last week dropped one of its suppliers after the discovery of horse DNA in some products.
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#22032
Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 263
As Europe's "horse-meat scandal" spreads (i.e. people being fed dog-food); the Irish are the latest to wonder what the "beef" they just ate really was.

The question now is how long until NORTH AMERICANS discover that we have also been eating DOG-FOOD -- but paying "people food" prices for it...???





Irish Town Lives Up to Motto as Horse-Meat Scandal Spreads

www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-13/irish-...l-goes-european.html

“Be at the center,” is the motto of the Irish town of Ballybay. As the scandal over horse meat masquerading as beef gallops across Europe, its founders may not have realized how true that would turn out.

An inspection last month found frozen hamburgers made by Silvercrest Foods, the town’s biggest employer, contained 29 percent horse meat. Production was halted and Tesco Plc, the U.K.’s largest retailer, dropped Silvercrest as a supplier.

“This is just a small place and now people from all over are associating the area with horse meat,” said Evelyn Steen, standing on her farm in Ballybay as she prepared to tend her 40 cattle. “We’re very annoyed by it all. It’s terrible.”

As the scope of the contamination unfolds, the global and opaque nature of the food chain is being exposed to European consumers like never before. The U.K. Food Standards Agency raided meat plants in West Yorkshire and Wales yesterday as part of the investigation. Irish Agriculture Minister Simon Coveney said the scandal is a Europe-wide issue involving fraud.

Six French supermarket companies including Carrefour SA withdrew some products made by Findus Group Ltd. this week after tests showed some beef lasagna included horse meat. Tesco apologized to customers on Feb. 11 after finding horse DNA in its discount spaghetti Bolognese the company said was made in a factory that also produced foods for Findus.

“It highlights the fragility of the international supply chain,” said Bryan Roberts, an analyst at Kantar Retail in London. “The mind boggles at the complexity of it all.”
Supply Network

The horse traces in the foods Silvercrest had been shipping is linked to raw material imported from Poland, the Irish government said. The Findus ready meals labeled as beef-based and containing horse were manufactured at a Luxembourg factory owned by French company Comigel, France’s consumer and anti- fraud office DGCCRF reported on Feb. 9.

Comigel’s meat supplier was Spanghero SAS. It had bought the frozen meat from a Cypriot trader that in turn sub- contracted a Dutch trader who sourced the meat from a slaughterhouse and a meat packer in Romania, according to the DGCCRF. Romanian Prime Minister Victor Ponta has said there was no evidence of wrongdoing at Romanian companies.

“As time goes on, the more obvious is that this is a European problem that involves a whole series of countries,” Coveney told broadcaster RTE yesterday. “It was because of the vigilance of our testing and control regime in Ireland that what is now a pan European problem was exposed.”
Equine History

Meanwhile, for the 1,000 or so residents in Ballybay, County Monaghan, close to the border with Northern Ireland, the attention has been as surprising as it has been unwelcome.

In a past life, Ballybay was a horse trading center. During the First World War, a local family produced as many as 300 horses a week, much of them sold to the British Army, and the town thrived as blacksmiths, saddle and harness makers moved to the area, according to the town’s website.

Yet the 18th century town became known more as a center of the Irish linen industry, and now is more of stop-off point for bird watchers drawn to the local lakes. One resident at least reckons he may benefit from the horse-meat scandal.

“We’ve been here 30 years,” said Ciaran Traynor, 46, a butcher at Quinn’s shop on Ballybay’s main street. “People here know where our beef comes from, that it is what we say it is and they trust us. It could be good for us.”
‘No Joke’

Ireland’s food safety authority found horse DNA in the Silvercrest frozen beef burgers on Jan. 15. The company’s parent, County Louth-based ABP, suspended all production at the facility two days later. The investigation is continuing.

A second meat plant in county Monaghan was found to have traces of horse in some of its products, the Agriculture Ministry said in a statement on Feb. 5.

The Silvercrest plant with its painted steel sits opposite a graveyard at the northern-edge of Ballybay overlooking the town’s main street. A spokeswoman for ABP declined to comment on the future of the facility, which employs 112 people.

A few hundred yards away, Latvian immigrant Artis Alksnis leans against the wall of his barber’s shop smoking a cigarette. He opened the business a few months ago.

“When I heard this, I thought maybe it was a joke about the horse meat,” said Alksnis. “But it’s no joke. We rely on that factory. It employs a lot of people. Business is quiet already, if it stops, it will be very bad for the town. People will think it is a horse-meat town.”
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#22038
Re: Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 168
The question now is how long until NORTH AMERICANS discover that we have also been eating DOG-FOOD -- but paying "people food" prices for it...???
One of my friends was telling me that all this horse food has been discovered in the "money saver" types of products ? If that is the case then it re-inforces the old saying that "If it is too good to be true, then it ain't"
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#22041
Re: Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 218
Samix,


"If it is too good to be true, then it ain't".

Spoken like a "true", US Southern gentleman (we do have a lot in common).

You make me PROUD.

Take Care
Earl
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#22043
Meat Industry Now Consumes Four-Fifths Antibiotics 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 218

The Meat Industry Now Consumes Four-Fifths of All Antibiotics


—By Tom Philpott

www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2013/02...-gorging-antibiotics

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration proposed a set of voluntary "guidelines" designed to nudge the meat industry to curb its antibiotics habit. Ever since, the agency has been mulling whether and how to implement the new program. Meanwhile, the meat industry has been merrily gorging away on antibiotics—and churning out meat rife with antibiotic-resistant pathogens—if the latest data from the FDA itself is any indication.

The Pew Charitable Trusts crunched the agency's numbers on antibiotic use on livestock farms and compared them to data on human use of antibiotics to treat illness, and mashed it all into an infographic, which I've excerpted below. Note that that while human antibiotic use has leveled off at below 8 billion pounds annually, livestock farms have been sucking in more and more of the drugs each year—and consumption reached a record nearly 29.9 billion pounds in 2011. To put it another way, the livestock industry is now consuming nearly four-fifths of the antibiotics used in the US, and its appetite for them is growing.
Pew Charitable Trusts.

To view graph=www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2013/02...-gorging-antibiotics

In an email, a Pew spokesperson added that while the American Meat Institute reported a 0.2 percent increase in total meat and poultry production in 2011 compared to the previous year, the FDA data show that antibiotic consumption jumped 2 percent over the same time period. That suggests that meat production might be getting more antibiotic-intensive.

Not surprisingly, when you cram animals together by the thousands and dose them daily with antibiotics, the bacteria that live on and in the animals adapt and develop resistance to those bacteria killers. Pew crunched another new set of data, the FDA's latest release of results from its National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System, or NARMS, which buys samples of meat products and subjects them to testing for bacterial pathogens. Again, the results are sobering. Here a a few highlights pointed to by Pew in an email:

• Of the Salmonella on ground turkey, about 78% were resistant to at least one antibiotic and half of the bacteria were resistant to three or more. These figures are up compared to 2010.

• Nearly three-quarters of the Salmonella found on retail chicken breast were resistant to at least one antibiotic. About 12% of retail chicken breast and ground turkey samples were contaminated with Salmonella.

• Resistance to tetracycline [an antibiotic] is up among Campylobacter on retail chicken. About 95% of chicken products were contaminated with Campylobacter, and nearly half of those bacteria were resistant to tetracyclines. This reflects an increase over last year and 2002.

Takeaway: While the FDA dithers with voluntary approaches to regulation, the meat industry is feasting on antibiotics and sending out product tainted with antibiotic-resistant bugs.
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#22048
Re: Meat Industry Now Consumes Four-Fifths Antibiotics 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 263
It's just a matter of time before these mindless Meat Oligarchs create some Super Bug which wipes out all life...


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#22051
Re: Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 168
Earl wrote:
Samix,


"If it is too good to be true, then it ain't".

Spoken like a "true", US Southern gentleman (we do have a lot in common).

You make me PROUD.

Take Care
Earl

Thank you Earl! I never knew that was a US southern kind of line. We do have a lot in common, and I am proud of you too!
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#22060
Re: Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 263
samix wrote:
Earl wrote:
Samix,


"If it is too good to be true, then it ain't".

Spoken like a "true", US Southern gentleman (we do have a lot in common).

You make me PROUD.

Take Care
Earl

Thank you Earl! I never knew that was a US southern kind of line. We do have a lot in common, and I am proud of you too!



Samix, given the reputation of Indians for their "shrewdness" in commerce (to be polite - lol); I'm guessing that there is a SIMILAR expression of this principle in India.

I say this after watching Indian-Canadian comedian Russell Peters (obviously his "stage name"). In one of his jokes, he talks about how an Indian invented the number zero. And according to Peters, this is how it happened.

An Indian was doing some shopping/bartering (since apparently Indians have a deep aversion to paying the "sticker price" on anything). And the merchant at the shop asks his Indian customer how much he wants to pay for the item he was looking at.

The Indian shopper pauses a moment for reflection, and then in a burst of inspiration he replies "ZERO."


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#22072
Re: Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 168
Haha, that is so true, in India or probably in most Asian cultures if you come back paying the sticker price, you are considered as "ripped off" and an "idiot shopper", sometimes people will haggle over a rupee and two and the deal may be called off!
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#22080
Re: Irish being fed Horse-meat TOO !!!! 1 Year, 8 Months ago Karma: 263
Samix, if you Google "Russell Peters" you can likely find some of his clips. I'm not as big a fan of his recent material. But when he first began, he did a lot more of his Indian schtick.

Part of it was portraying the attitude of harsh, corporal punishment which existed (exists?) in "old-school" Indian families. While it may not be "politically correct", when he mimicks his father in a heavy, Indian accent and says "Somebody is going to get a hurt," it generally cracks up the audience.

And then he talks about (supposed) episodes of his father trying to "barter" for all sorts of things over here -- like the price of gasoline...

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