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Egypt: the BEGINNING, not the END
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TOPIC: Egypt: the BEGINNING, not the END
#17331
Mubaruk stooge tries to bring back old regime 2 Years, 5 Months ago Karma: 262
I decided to resurrect this old thread on the "Arab Spring" after seeing a Bloomberg article today where the Mubaruk era stooge running for president was DENYING that he was trying to bring back the old regime in the upcoming Egyptian election.

It seemed appropriate to restart the thread created at the BEGINNING of this process, as we see the very real prospect of this movement simply going in a circle - i.e. getting rid of one group of Fascists only to replace them with another.

It's NOT enough merely to banish a bad government, and Pete Townsend's words from 40 years ago are even MORE haunting today:

Meet the NEW Boss,
Same as the old Boss...




P.S. If there was ONE person from a Fascist regime who people would NEVER want to have form a NEW government it would be the old "intelligence chief" (i.e. the Gestapo).




"Suleiman Denies Reviving Old Regime as Egypt Vote Race Begins"

www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-09/egypt-...ocus-on-economy.html

Egypt’s former intelligence chief said his presidential bid isn’t an effort to restore the ousted regime he served, as the Muslim Brotherhood’s main candidate blamed Egypt’s economic woes on the Hosni Mubarak era.

Omar Suleiman, who was Mubarak’s deputy in the last days of his rule, told the state-run al-Akhbar newspaper that last year’s uprising created a “new reality” that cannot be reversed. “The priority will be to salvage the country from the dominant chaos,” Suleiman said, promising rapid measures to restore stability and fight crime.

The comments, a day after presidential nominations closed, show Suleiman laying out a law-and-order platform and seeking to distance himself from his former boss as he prepares for elections due to start on May 23. His entry into the race has drawn accusations that Egypt’s ruling generals are trying to revive the old regime. Other Egyptians have expressed fears that Islamists, who have put forward several candidates, are seeking to monopolize power.

The contest also takes place against a backdrop of a struggling economy and a wave of crime. Gross domestic product contracted last year and the central bank has spent more than half the country’s international reserves since the start of 2011, as it seeks to defend the currency. A $3.2 billion International Monetary Fund loan requested by Egypt in January has yet to be concluded, with the Brotherhood putting up opposition to the deal.
‘Grave Challenge’

“We are facing a very difficult and grave challenge,” millionaire businessman Khairat el-Shater, who is the Brotherhood’s leading nominee for the presidency after serving as the group’s second-in-command and chief financier. “Will we service the debt or plug the deficit or feed the people and educate them and find housing and hospitals for them?” he said at a televised press conference.

Suleiman has denied allegations that his campaign is being orchestrated by the military, which says it will cede power after the presidential vote. He also said that he received death threats from Islamists. If people “believe that those threats can reverse my stance or the continuation of my candidacy, then they are deluded,” Suleiman said.

Suleiman ranked fourth among the declared candidates with the support of 8.2 percent of voters, according to a poll published by the state-run Al Ahram newspaper. Former Arab League Secretary-General Amre Moussa led with 31 percent, while El-Shater trailed with 1.7 percent.
‘No Alternative’

El-Shater has met with U.S. businessmen and officials and sought to show that the Brotherhood will embrace free-market policies. He said that Egypt’s budget deficit, forecast by the government at around 9 percent of economic output this year and next, means there is a need for non-government funds from Egypt and abroad to finance development programs.

“We are for supporting the private sector, not for ideological reasons as some will say, but because this is necessary and there’s no other alternative,” he said at today’s press conference. He said the first stage of any new economic plan should be “putting out the fires” -- dealing with the immediate needs of the people.

In a reflection of the challenges the country faces daily, train drivers held a sit-in on the tracks of Cairo’s central station today, bringing traffic to a halt, the private ON TV station reported. Police personnel also demonstrated in front of the Interior Ministry.
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#17910
Violence in Egypt!! 2 Years, 4 Months ago Karma: 262
With just three weeks to go before Egypt's elections, and the pro-Western stooge running for office unlikely to win; what a surprise that we would see VIOLENCE so disruptive that it's caused the candidates to suspend their campaigns.

The violence was attributed to "unknown assailants". In our Age of Fascism, that most likely means THUGS who were HIRED by the West to sabotage the political process in Egypt.

Ironically, "democracy" is now ONLY allowed to function if/when the STOOGE whom the Oligarchs have selected is assured of victory...





"Egypt Clashes Kill 9; Presidential Hopefuls Suspend Campaign"


www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-02/egypt-...end-campaign-2-.html

Clashes between Egyptian protesters and unknown assailants left at least nine people dead, as the worst street violence in Cairo this year added to the unrest in the country three weeks before slated presidential elections.

The violence that erupted around dawn near the Defense Ministry prompted two leading presidential candidates to announce they were suspending their campaigns in protest. Mohamed Mursi, who was fielded for the presidency by the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party, put the blame primarily on the ruling military.

“The military council, which has security and intelligence capabilities, must look for the culprits and enforce the law against those who are trying to derail” the transition to democracy, Mursi told reporters today. “We hold the military council responsible because it’s the one that runs the country, has the authority and the security forces.”

The fighting, which also left at least 49 wounded, according to the Health Ministry, was the latest outbreak of unrest that has hampered efforts to restore stability and revive economic growth in Egypt after the popular uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak. The Islamist-dominated parliament is calling for the resignation of the military-appointed government in the run- up to presidential elections due to begin on May 23. The ruling generals say they will hand over power after the vote.
Campaign Suspended

Islamist presidential candidate Abdel-Moneim Aboul Fotouh announced on his Twitter account that he was suspending his campaign, and said the state “must protect peaceful demonstrations.”

Police and military forces were deployed to halt the violence hours after the clashes erupted, Nile News reported. Many of the protesters were supporters of Hazem Abou Ismail, the Salafi lawyer-turned-cleric who was disqualified from the presidential race because his mother held U.S. citizenship before her death. Abou Ismail has criticized the move as an attempt to sideline him from the race.

Seif Abu Samra, the head of the prosecutor’s office in the Cairo neighborhood of Waili, said that many of the dead had gunshot wounds.

Mursi’s comments reflect the Brotherhood’s ongoing battle with the military council over who is to blame for the country’s woes. The showdown has mired Egypt in political paralysis, with a panel to draft the new constitution disbanded, a $3.2 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund delayed by political wrangling and the constitutional court due to rule May 6 on the legitimacy of the parliament.
New Constitution

A meeting today between party leaders and the military council to discuss the formation of a panel to draft a new constitution was boycotted by some of the groups due to the violence. The military is considering the possibility of handing over power to a civilian government on May 24 if a winner emerges in the first round of the elections, lawmaker Moustafa Bakri cited armed forces Chief of Staff Lieutenant General Sami Enan as saying during the meeting.

A parliamentary committee shot down an earlier proposal for the committee’s composition, raising doubts whether the charter will be written and approved before the new president takes office by the end of June.

Mursi said that the presidential elections should not be postponed, even though it appeared it would be “difficult” to finish the constitution before the election. He vowed that if elected, he would work to ensure that the charter was completed in a “matter of months, not years.”
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#18009
"Egypt imposes curfew, deploys army after protests 2 Years, 4 Months ago Karma: 262
And the "green shoots" of Democracy continue to wither in Egypt.

STRANGELY, the propaganda machine tells us that "the people" are engaging in violence - as the UNPOPULAR representative of the OLD dictatorship is about to be DEFEATED by populist representatives of the people.

THAT makes sense, doesn't it?

Call me "paranoid", but what I see is the Old Guard looking to SABOTAGE the democratic process and INTIMIDATE any who dare to vote for change. And even IF a pro-PEOPLE candidate emerges victorious we will CONTINUE to see more violence - as the Old Guard uses their HIRED GOONS to continue to attempt to restore the previous Fascist regime.

Hiring thugs to PRETEND to represent "ordinary protesters" is now THE most-frequently used tactic to destroy/discredit any and all "protest movements". And it is PARTICULARLY over-used by Western governments...


"Egypt imposes curfew, deploys army after protests"

www.reuters.com/article/2012/05/05/us-eg...dUSBRE8430P520120505

(Reuters) - Egypt's military rulers on Saturday imposed an overnight curfew and deployed soldiers around the Defence Ministry to deter a repeat of Friday's deadly violence, less than three weeks before a presidential vote.

One soldier died and almost 400 people were wounded in Friday's clashes, the second time in a week that protests over the army's handling of Egypt's troubled transition from army rule to civilian government have turned violent.

The military imposed a 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. curfew (2100 GMT to 0500 GMT) in the Abbasiya district around the defense ministry for the second straight day, according to a military source.

The streets were calm on Saturday as cleaners swept up rocks and other projectiles hurled by protestors during the previous night's violence. Troops responded with fired teargas and charged the crowd to drive them from the ministry.

Eleven people were killed in disturbances on Wednesday.

The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists said at least 18 journalists had been assaulted, injured or arrested while covering the clashes.

"We call on the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces to identify the attackers and bring them to justice immediately, as well as to release journalists in custody," Mohamed Abdel Dayem, CPJ's Middle East and North Africa program coordinator, said in a statement issued late on Friday.

A presidential election, which starts on May 23-24, will choose a replacement for Hosni Mubarak, who was toppled in February last year. Generals have governed since then but their rule has been punctuated by violence and political bickering.

Many protesters who gathered near the ministry were ultra-orthodox Salafi Muslims furious that a sheikh they backed for president was disqualified from the race. Liberals and others were also there, accusing the army of seeking to manipulate or delay the vote.

The military has dismissed those allegations, insisting it will stick to its timetable of handing over power to a new president by July 1, or even earlier in the unlikely event of an outright winner in the first round of voting this month.

"Our mission ends with a successful handover of power, and we will not let anyone change the declared schedule," an army source told the website of the state-owned Al-Ahram daily.

RISING FRUSTRATION

The authorities detained 300 people, according to a military source who said they would be held for 15 days pending investigations into Friday's events.

The army had warned protesters on Thursday during a news conference that it would not tolerate threats to any of its installations. The funeral for the soldier killed took place on Saturday.

Troop carriers and soldiers formed cordons protecting the area around the ministry and deployed at nearby installations belonging to the army, which for the first time in six decades faces the prospect of a president who has not been plucked from its senior ranks.

Mubarak, like his predecessors since the king was toppled in 1952, had been a top military officer before becoming president.

Many of the protesters have called for the army to step aside sooner than planned. Scenes of troops beating protesters with sticks in anti-army demonstrations in recent months have angered many Egyptians, who expect the generals to wield their influence from behind the scenes even after a formal handover.

But many other Egyptians are equally frustrated at the protesters, accusing them of stirring up trouble on the streets and helping drive the economy to the brink of a balance of payments crisis. The nation's foreign reserves have plunged.

"The army is our leader in this period and they said a million times that they don't want to stay in power. We have elections in a few days, so I don't understand what all yesterday's fuss and violence was all about," said Essam Mohamed, 51, a government office worker in the Abbasiya area.

The presidential race broadly pits Islamists against more liberal candidates who at one time or another served in Mubarak's administration.

The two frontrunners are Abdel Moneim Abol Fotouh, an Islamist who has won the backing of a broad range of voters ranging from liberals to hardline Salafi Islamists, and Amr Moussa, the former head of the Arab League and one-time foreign minister. The Muslim Brotherhood is also fielding a candidate.

In a statement issued on Saturday, the Brotherhood condemned the violence and blamed the ruling military council for it.
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#18010
Re: "Egypt imposes curfew, deploys army after protests 2 Years, 4 Months ago Karma: 262
P.S. I almost forgot to add the EQUALLY important reason why our governments love to hire THUGS to engage in acts of violence during (peaceful) protests: it gives them a GREAT EXCUSE to pull out their riot police and start cracking skulls...both now and in the future.


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#18017
Re: "Egypt imposes curfew, deploys army after protests 2 Years, 4 Months ago Karma: 218
Jeff,

This is just a test- repeat just a test.

" Every cop is a criminal and all the sinners saints"

Just had to throw that one in, to a "Billy Joel" fan.

Gonna go strum some strings, and not make them weep-

"cause only the good die young, out here in a Florida town".

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#18792
Egypt elects new government 2 Years, 2 Months ago Karma: 262
Reasons for cautious optimism today, after Egypt freely elected a non-military political party to resume control of its government, ending nearly a half-century of military dictatorship.

Obviously questions remain:

1) Is the victorious party TRULY "independent"; or, has it already been bought-off/corrupted by the regions power-brokers (i.e. the U.S. or Israel)?

2) If this government is actually independent, will it be ALLOWED to provide good government to the people of Egypt, or has the West (secretly) already decided to sabotage this regime (as they seek to do with any/every Muslim which seeks to embrace true democracy; and modern, secular societies)?

However, for the moment at leastt, let's let the people of Egypt ENJOY this victory!




"Islamist joy as Morsy elected Egypt president"

www.reuters.com/article/2012/06/24/us-eg...dUSBRE85G01U20120624

(Reuters) - Islamist Mohamed Morsy was declared Egypt's first freely elected president on Sunday, sparking joy among his Muslim Brotherhood supporters on the streets who vowed to continue to try to wrest power from armed forces reluctant to cede ultimate control.

But many Egyptians, and anxious Western allies, also urged Morsy to work fast to repair the economy and bitter divisions in society exposed since the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak fractured the police state which had kept the country subdued for decades.

Morsy defeated former general Ahmed Shafik in a run-off last weekend by a convincing 3.5 percentage points, or nearly 900,000 votes, taking 51.7 percent of the total, officials said. It ended a week of disputes over the count that had frayed nerves.

Morsy succeeds Mubarak, who was pushed aside by his fellow officers 16 months ago to appease the Arab Spring revolution.

The military council which has ruled the biggest Arab nation since then, curbed the powers of the presidency by decree last week, meaning the head of state will have to work closely with the army on a planned democratic constitution.

The generals say they want to hand over to civilian rule but are plainly set on defending their privileges and suspicious of the ability of Egypt's fragmented, and long oppressed, political movements to establish a stable constitutional democracy.

The United States, the army's key sponsor and long wary of the rise of political Islam, joined other Western powers in congratulating Morsy and calling on him to form a government of national unity and to respect all Egyptians' civil rights.

Brotherhood officials, speaking as supporters turned Cairo's Tahrir Square into a roaring sea of flags and chants of "Allahu akbar!" (God is greatest), said they would press on with protest vigils to demand that the ruling military council cancel this month's dissolution of the Islamist-led parliament and a decree which gave the generals powers that will restrict the president.

"Morsy is the first truly democratically elected president in Egypt," the Brotherhood's Yasser Ali told Reuters.

"He has the legitimacy and will sit down with the military council and all the political forces to resolve the outstanding issues over parliament and the constitutional decree and the newly imposed emergency law."

"Speak! Have no fear! The military must go!" crowds chanted on Tahrir Square, seat of the revolt, although senior officials in the movement, the veteran adversary of the army for decades, said they wanted to avoid outright confrontation.

There were some isolated scuffles in parts of Cairo between rival groups. Several hundred Shafik supporters in the middle-class suburb of Nasr City chanted "Save Egypt! The Brotherhood will destroy it!", while soldiers tried to keep traffic moving.

Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, who heads the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), called to congratulate the 60-year-old Morsy on his victory, state television said.

How these two men cooperate will determine Egypt's uncertain path from revolution to democracy and its relations with anxious Arab and Western allies: Tantawi was Mubarak's defense minister for 20 years and has been close to the Pentagon; Morsy, jailed more than once under the old regime, has a doctorate in engineering from the University of Southern California.

PROTESTS GO ON

Another official at the Brotherhood's headquarters, Gihad Haddad, said demonstrations would also continue to press the army: "The peaceful protests will continue in the squares and across Egypt. The struggle for a new Egypt is just beginning."

Those who voted for Shafik as a bulwark against a religious rule that they fear will mean intolerance and alienation from the West were fearful: businessman Maged Abdel Wadud, 45, who had gathered with others at a hotel hoping to greet a victorious Shafik said: "This is a very bad day for Egypt.

"I am so, so upset. I can't imagine this man becoming a president of Egypt. This is the beginning of the end for Egypt."

Some of those backing Shafik accused the military council and Tantawi of "selling out" to the Brotherhood. But a source close to the council itself insisted the election had been entirely fair, in contrast to those under Mubarak.

Describing it as "a true example of democracy to the world" the military council source stressed the pressure was now on Morsy to take responsibility - something many think might backfire on the Brotherhood if Egypt remains in crisis:

"The onus now is on the new president to unite the nation and create a true coalition of political and revolutionary forces to rebuild the country economically and politically," the source said. "The world is now watching the new president to see whether his tenure will reflect all political currents."

Western powers, and Israel, have been concerned about the Islamist turn in Egypt. But Washington and Europe, both big aid donors, have also pressed the military to accept democracy, while urging the Brotherhood to respect all Egyptians' rights - notably those of women and the large Christian minority.

"This is an historic moment for Egypt," said British Foreign Secretary William Hague. "I welcome President Morsy's statement that he intends to form an inclusive government that governs on behalf of all the Egyptian people."

In his congratulations, French President Francois Hollande said: "It is key today that the transition which started in February 2011 continues, so that a democratic and pluralist political system establishes itself in Egypt, guaranteeing civil liberties and political freedom to all citizens."

In Israel, at war with the Brotherhood's Palestinian offshoot Hamas, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he "respected" the democratic outcome in Egypt and expected to continue cooperation under the two states' peace treaty.

In Hamas-run Gaza, where Palestinians hope Morsy may end Cairo's cooperation with an Israeli blockade, celebratory gunfire rattled across the crowded coastal territory.

Iran, which is at odds with most Arab states, welcomed what it called an "Islamic awakening" in Egypt.

Reformist Egyptian politician Mohamed ElBaradei, a former U.N. diplomat, tweeted: "It is time for us to all work together as Egyptians in a framework of national consensus."

A senior Western diplomat in Cairo said: "This is a truly historic moment for Egypt - a triumph over the politics of fear and prejudice. Egypt has a civilian, democratically elected president for the first time in its history. The Muslim Brotherhood are far from a perfect organization, but Morsy's election represents a genuine result for the revolution."

He said he did not expect the movement to push its complaints so far as to provoke the military council to react and take from the presidency those powers it still has:

"The Muslim Brotherhood will take what they've got - a prize unimaginable to them 18 months ago," the diplomat said. "An imperfect presidency is way better than none at all.

"It's part of the new and delicate act of political compromise, part of Egypt's new cohabitation."

LIBERALS CAUTIOUS

Half of those who voted in last month's first round of the election backed neither Morsy nor Shafik and many who voted in the run-off voted negatively - either against Morsy's religious agenda or against Shafik as a symbol of military rule.

Hamdeen Sabahy, the secular leftist who finished a close third behind Shafik in the first round, called on Morsy to "swiftly form a national presidential administration and a government that expresses national reconciliation and represents all currents and the diversity of Egyptian society powers".

For Morsy a spokesman said: "This is a testament to the resolve of the Egyptian people to make their voice heard."

Shafik, a former air force commander and Mubarak's last prime minister, offered no immediate reaction. He has said he would offer to serve in a Morsy administration.

Morsy won the first round ballot in May with a little under a quarter of the vote. He has pledged to form an inclusive government to appeal to all the 82 million Egyptians.

"President Morsy will struggle to control the levers of state," Elijah Zarwan, senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, said in Cairo.

"He will likely face foot-dragging and perhaps outright attempts to undermine his initiatives from key institutions. Faced with such resistance, frustration may tempt him to fall into the trap of attempting to throw his new weight around," Zarwan told Reuters. "This would be a mistake.

"His challenge is to lead a bitterly divided, fearful, and angry population toward a peaceful democratic outcome, without becoming a reviled scapegoat for continued military rule."

ISLAMIC RENAISSANCE

Morsy has promised a moderate Islamist agenda to steer Egypt into a new democratic era where autocracy will be replaced by transparent government that respects human rights and revives the fortunes of a powerful Arab state long in decline. Morsy is promising an "Egyptian renaissance with an Islamic foundation".

Yet the stocky, bespectacled party official appears something of an accidental president: he was only flung into the race at the last moment by the disqualification on a technicality of Khairat al-Shater, the group's preferred choice.

With a stiff and formal style, Morsy cast himself as a reluctant latecomer to the race, who cited religious fear of judgment day as one of his reasons for running. He struggled to shake off his label as the Brotherhood's "spare tire".

Questions remain over the extent to which Morsy will operate independently of other Brotherhood leaders once in office: his manifesto was drawn up by the group's policymakers. The role Shater might play has been one focus of debate in Egypt.

"I will treat everyone equally and be a servant of the Egyptian people," Morsy said at his campaign headquarters in Cairo shortly after polling ended last Sunday. He gave up his membership of the Brotherhood after being elected.

Turnout was only 51.8 percent of the 50 million-strong electorate, slightly up on the first round but indicative still of a nation unused to having its voice heard without risking punishment and uncertain of the worth of the candidates.
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#21964
Thugs disrupt Egypt, attract media attention 1 Year, 7 Months ago Karma: 262
I thought it was a good time to update/resurrect this older thread, since what's happening today traces all the way back to the beginning of the so-called "Arab Spring". And where one of the only true episodes of "reform" in what has been mostly Western-sponsored coups was the ousting of corrupt Western puppet, and former Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubaruk.

However, as we see with the Imperialist West; it's one thing to remove one of their thugs from power -- but quite another thing to remain "liberated" (i.e. not under the Western Thumb). First Egyptians had to actually choose a non-puppet government, while the Western-sponsored Corporate media (inside Egypt) did its best to try to dupe people into supporting FORMER Mubaruk stooges, and Western puppets like Muhammed El Baradei.

But even after throwing out Mubaruk AND choosing a free government; we're still only at the beginning of the process. Now this fledging government has to try to survive every vicious/disruptive/illegal tactic that money can buy to sabotage and disrupt the government.

And then (hypocrites that they are), after spending their dirty money sabotaging the government; they have the audacity to HYPE their own dirty-tricks with their propaganda machine -- to try to make the government appear to be unpopular and/or failing.

So today we see the Western propaganda machine (as usual led by Bloomberg) hyping some thuggery by hired (Western) goons, and thugs still "loyal" (for lack of a better word) to the old puppet-regime.

First we see the sensational Bloomberg headline...

Egypt Erupts as Demonstrators Vent Anger on Cairo Palace

Ooooh! Sounds like big (bad) things are happening in Egypt. And then we start to read this piece of Western propaganda (to try to find some "facts"), and we see a picture somewhat different from the Bloomberg headline.

In a nation of around 100 million people, it turns out that this "eruption" was comprised of (according to Bloomberg) "thousands" of hired thugs -- along with some of their 'friends and well-wishers'. And given the propensity of our Corporate media to "exaggerate" (i.e. completely fabricate things); it's very possible that this "eruption of thousands" was in fact only a thousand, or perhaps even less.

Note how similar this episode is to the "eruptions" which now take place in Western cities. We'll have large numbers of peaceful protesters placidly gathered to demonstrate against some "meeting" of the international Establishment (like when they were ramming "globalization" down our throats) -- and then out-of-the-blue some SMALL gang of thugs will start engaging in vandalism, and minor (but camera-friendly) "confrontations" with the Riot Nazis now always conveniently assembled.

Of course in these staged acts of violence in the West, we don't hear the Corporate Media talking about "unpopular" or "failing" governments. No, remarkably, in the West when these gangs of (hired) goons engage in their minor episodes of mayhem; it's always the GOONS who are completely to blame.

And what is the "solution" for the goon-problem (i.e. the government's own, hired thugs)? To get LARGER phalanxes of their own Riot Nazis, to ARM THEM more heavily, and to order to use them ever-increasing levels of force to "deter" their self-created problem.

Yet in Egypt, when exactly the same people hire exactly the same sort of thugs to engage in exactly the same sort of petty violence; suddenly the Corporate Media tells us that the "problem" is bad government !!



Sadly, it doesn't matter how absurd, transparent, or hypocritical such a propaganda campaign is. All that matters is how effectively the West's hired thugs can disrupt/sabotage this new government, and how patient/astute the Egyptian people are in understanding what is taking place.

One of the reasons why Iceland is one of the few "success stories" in throwing out Western Hegemony (in financial form) in their own nation was that they had a very educated-and-aware population -- who understood what the government is doing, and why.

Obviously as a much poorer nation the same level of education cannot be present in Egypt's population. Let's hope that they can compensate for that for more "street smarts". After all, having lived next to Israel for nearly 70 years they've seen (up close) a lot of "dirty tricks".



But note this one paragraph:

...One person died and 216 others were wounded in clashes in five provinces, including Egypt, Alexandria and Gharbeya, MENA said, citing spokesman for the Health Ministry Ahmed Omar. It was not clear how many of the injured were police. An unidentified security official at the interior ministry told MENA that 102 police officers and soldiers were wounded, some with gunshot wounds, while 93 people were arrested.

Now THAT does sound serious. But who/what is reporting these numbers? "MENA" -- the Middle East News Agency. This was all I was able to find out about "MENA" in some brief surfing/researching:

www.linkedin.com/company/middle-east-news-agency-mena-

Unless my anti-propaganda "radar" is totally malfunctioning, this is nothing but a propaganda mouthpiece created by the West -- which appears to have strong UN ties and/or influence.

Note that those collective numbers are totally disproportionate to the very MINOR thuggery described by Bloomberg all through this piece; and thus we have good reason to be highly suspicious of those numbers.





Egypt Erupts as Demonstrators Vent Anger on Cairo Palace

www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-08/egypti...th-stirs-unrest.html

Demonstrators threw Molotov cocktails and rocks at the main presidential palace in Cairo yesterday, as thousands rallied against President Mohamed Mursi and his Muslim Brotherhood in protests that ignited clashes across the country.

The army put up barbed wire, and the Republican Guard fanned around the palace. Police used tear gas to disperse protesters armed with the Molotov cocktails that set parts of the palace on fire, the official Middle East News Agency reported, citing an interior ministry official. Security forces also clashed with protesters around President Mohamed Mursi’s house and Freedom and Justice Party headquarters in al-Sharqiya, MENA said.

Protesters in the capital marched from the Mostafa Mahmoud Mosque to Tahrir Square, and from the Nour Mosque to the palace. Demonstrators blocked the subway at Sadat station in the direction of the southern Helwan suburb, state-run Ahram Gate said.

Police also fired tear gas at demonstrators in Alexandria and in the Delta province of Kafr al-Sheikh, where protesters were attempting to storm the city’s governorate headquarters, state-run al Ahram said on its website.
Death, Injuries

One person died and 216 others were wounded in clashes in five provinces, including Egypt, Alexandria and Gharbeya, MENA said, citing spokesman for the Health Ministry Ahmed Omar. It was not clear how many of the injured were police. An unidentified security official at the interior ministry told MENA that 102 police officers and soldiers were wounded, some with gunshot wounds, while 93 people were arrested.

Egypt’s opposition called Feb. 7 for calm in anticipation of the protests, expressing concern that murder of Tunisian opposition leader Chukri Beleid in Tunis the previous day could trigger further unrest in the region and lead to copycat killings of opposition leaders in Egypt.

Tensions already were running high in Egypt, where Mursi has been accused of failing to deliver on campaign pledges. Unrest and violence, inspired by secularist suspicions over the Islamist leader’s motives, have left dozens dead in the past week and further stunted government efforts to revive the economy, which is struggling to recover from the turmoil that followed the revolt.
‘Dangerous Indicators’

The economy has grown about 2 percent annually in the past two years, the slowest pace since the early 1990s. Egypt is seeking a $4.8 billion International Monetary Fund loan.

Secularists in Egypt interpreted a religious edict by cleric Mohamed Shaaban as giving the go-ahead to kill Mursi’s opponents. The cleric named National Salvation Front opposition leaders such as Hamdeen Sabahi in comments aired live on the al- Hafez religious satellite channel on Feb. 2, and said “God’s verdict is death” for those “who want to burn Egypt.”

Egypt’s Cabinet said Feb. 7 it was examining measures to criminalize such fatwas, while the prosecutor general ordered an investigation.

“This kind of fatwa is the outcome of the polarization that has dominated the Egyptian political atmosphere” in recent months, Khalil al-Anani, a political analyst at Durham University in the U.K., said by phone. The edict, and Beleid’s assassination, are “very dangerous indicators that the political conflict can turn violent” if the Islamists fail to take a firm stance against incitements to violence.

Beleid’s death “is a very serious warning,” the Popular Current party, headed by former presidential hopeful Sabahi, said on its Facebook page. “It could mean the Arab Spring countries might go through a series of assassinations of the opposition.”
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#21965
Re: Thugs disrupt Egypt, attract media attention 1 Year, 7 Months ago Karma: 168
Very apt analysis Jeff, this is exactly what they are doing in Egypt, fortunately the new government has been able to hold as of now, unfortunatly on the neighbouring front, in Tunisia just a couple of days ago a "secularist"(recall what a secularist means in the Muslim world according to RAND, ie: anyone who is not an Islamist) leader was assassinated. The media has already declared that the Islamists are behind the assassination and it seems that the democratically elected government is now going to get dissolved and this is what the prime minister has to say

"Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali announced on Saturday that the key ministries held by fellow Islamists would be assigned to independents in his planned new government of non-partisan technocrats."
...
The candidate must be recognized expert in his field, should not be involved in a crime against Tunisian people, should not belong to a political party and must not run for the next elections,” Jebali added, during a meeting with a number of European ambassadors to Tunisia.

english.alarabiya.net/articles/2013/02/09/265348.html

So much for democracy, but I see no furore in the western media.
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#22069
Re: Thugs disrupt Egypt, attract media attention 1 Year, 7 Months ago Karma: 168
What an ironic day for the MSM in Egypt today, the "evil" and "blood thirsty" Islamists have held a rally today against "Bloody protests" going on in Egypt for the past some days.
Thousands of supporters of Islamist President Mohammed Mursi took to the street on Friday to denounce violence after weeks of bloody protests between police and anti-Mursi protesters.
The non Islamist civilized opposition did not participate in these protests except a few elements from them.
According to Essam Derbala, head of Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya, Friday’s protests will adopt the slogan: “Together Against Violence,” which is also backed by some elements from the liberal opposition coalition, the National Salvation Front (NSF).
On the contrary the opposition called for counter rallies on the same day
Meanwhile, a number of opposition parties called for counter rallies on Friday outside the presidential palace, to continue with series of protests that started last January against Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi and his government.
english.alarabiya.net/articles/2013/02/15/266391.html
samix
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#22078
Re: Thugs disrupt Egypt, attract media attention 1 Year, 7 Months ago Karma: 262
samix wrote:
What an ironic day for the MSM in Egypt today, the "evil" and "blood thirsty" Islamists have held a rally today against "Bloody protests" going on in Egypt for the past some days.
Thousands of supporters of Islamist President Mohammed Mursi took to the street on Friday to denounce violence after weeks of bloody protests between police and anti-Mursi protesters.
The non Islamist civilized opposition did not participate in these protests except a few elements from them.
According to Essam Derbala, head of Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya, Friday’s protests will adopt the slogan: “Together Against Violence,” which is also backed by some elements from the liberal opposition coalition, the National Salvation Front (NSF).
On the contrary the opposition called for counter rallies on the same day
Meanwhile, a number of opposition parties called for counter rallies on Friday outside the presidential palace, to continue with series of protests that started last January against Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi and his government.
english.alarabiya.net/articles/2013/02/15/266391.html



Samix, I find this both an appealing and potentially successful strategy.



On the one hand, with Western Fascists having less influence in Egypt than nearly every other Mid-East nation except Iran; it's definitely possible to attempt the "Gandhi" approach -- unity in rejecting violence.

Indeed, the strategy of the West (and most notably Israel) to perpetrate (endless) false-flag attacks in order to create mythical "enemies" is an obvious attempt to PREVENT another "Gandhi" from emerging in the world. Combined with their propaganda-machine megaphone; they successfully delude most of the Sheep into believing that "the Enemy" are the vicious killers, and "We" are merely defending ourselves.

Right. And Israel's 10:1 kill-ratio against the (virtually defenseless) Palestinians is simply very, very, very, very, very good "defense"...


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