Saturday, October 25, 2014
   
Text Size

Search our Site or Google

The Implication of Currency Dilution

Articles & Blogs - Gold Commentary

User Rating: / 14
PoorBest 

In our daily lives, we learn that there are many immutable principles of cause-and-effect. Drop an object from your hand and it will fall down, not up. Throw a rock at a pane of glass and it will break. Put an ice cube in the sun and it will melt.

So too it is with the cause-and-effect known as dilution. Whether we are an adult buying watered-down booze from a bar, or a child buying a watered-down beverage from a lemonade stand; we immediately comprehend that diluting the product has reduced its value – and thus we refuse to pay the same price for it.

Similarly, should a jeweler attempt to tell us that (less pure) 10-karat gold is worth as much as (more pure) 24-karat gold, we would simply scoff at such nonsense and walk away. And as I have noted several times in prior commentaries, even the dim-bulbs in the mainstream media can grasp the concept that if a company prints up a lot of shares (and thus dilutes shareholder equity) that the value of its shares must decline.

Indeed, in the entire known universe we have only one example of an item which (supposedly) does not automatically decline in value as it is diluted: the bankers’ fiat paper currencies. In fact, we have no shortage of clueless scribes claiming that it is possible for these currencies to actually increase in value as they are being diluted. Search the phrase “U.S. dollar rises in value”, and you would acquire repetitive strain disorder before you finished reading all the idiocy on that subject.

Regular readers know that I have found this logical absurdity to be positively maddening. Suggesting that (any of) our incessantly-diluted paper currencies could rise in value is just as insane as suggesting that I could drop something and it would “fall” upward…at least at first glance.

Then it suddenly occurred to me that there was one (and only one) theoretically possible scenario where a good which is being diluted could rise in value: if it was already worthless before the dilution even began. Obviously something which is “worthless” cannot possibly decline in value, as a matter of definition. So even though there is no reason to expect a worthless item to increase in value (as it’s being diluted), since it’s impossible to decline in value then it becomes at least quasi-rational to suggest that it might appreciate in value (somehow).

There is no other possible exception to the principle of dilution: the only good which would not automatically decline in value as it is being diluted is a good which was already worthless before the dilution commenced.

This brings us back to the bankers’ paper currencies. Who is it that insisted that these paper currencies ever had any value to begin with? The bankers. Who is it that leads the media choir in talking about these paper currencies “rising in value”? The bankers.

When it comes to the near-comatose drones in the mainstream media (and their “experts”), it’s not too difficult to believe that they simply don’t understand that these paper currencies were worthless to begin with. However, when it comes to the bankers who created these paper currencies, it becomes much more difficult to believe that these charlatans haven’t known all along that they have been peddling worthless paper to the masses (as fuel for their infinite acts of fraud).

 

Is there any other evidence that implicitly demonstrates that these bankers consider their own paper currencies to be worthless? Plenty. Let’s start with 0% interest rates in the U.S.; where the Federal Reserve has literally given away for free $trillions in freshly-printed greenbacks – all to the Wall Street crime syndicate. When you give something away for free year after year after year (in incomprehensibly huge quantities), the obvious implication is that what you are giving away is worthless.

Then there is the insatiable gambling of the bankster crime syndicate. With any normal person, while many of us enjoy dabbling in some occasional gambling we are very reluctant to place any large wagers – especially if such a bet were at long odds. Even a billionaire would be unlikely to ever wager $1 million in a single bet, despite that amount representing only 0.1% of the billionaire’s wealth. Then we have the bankers.

As has been noted in previous commentaries, all “derivatives” are literally nothing but bets. The derivatives market is simply the world’s largest (rigged) casino. Presently, that mountain of bets amounts to somewhere in excess of twenty times total global GDP. We don’t know how much in excess because the bankers changed their “definition” of this market a couple of years ago in order to obscure the true quantum of their gambling.

Many of these bets are at extreme odds. Pay-outs in the (totally fraudulent) $60+ trillion credit default swaps market can (and do) exceed 300:1. There is only one scenario where people engage in gambling with such reckless extravagance: when they are using “play money”. Whether we are talking about a game of Monopoly, or some other pretend “game of chance”; the only time that people engage in gambling with absolutely no qualms about losing is where they know they are playing with “money” which has no value. Note that such extreme gambling began long before these banks ever proclaimed themselves “too big to fail.”

This is a very good time to remind readers that we are talking about “fiat paper currencies”: currency which (by definition) only has value by decree (or “fiat”). Thus the “money” we are forced to use in our societies thanks to our cabal of bankers and politicians does/could only acquire any value at all by the decree of our governments. Meanwhile, with all their acts and deeds we have the creators of all this fiat paper (the bankers) treating these currencies as if they are totally worthless – as they swap their paper for gold at the fastest rate in history.

As a matter of logic, I’ve once again demonstrated that our paper currencies are clearly worthless. However, with people having literally been brainwashed every day of their lives into believing that the bankers’ paper is “money”, I know this is a hard-sell to the Sheep. At the very least I have established that our central banks are absolutely unfit custodians for our currencies.

The Federal Reserve was created 100 years ago with a mandate of “protecting the U.S. dollar”. Since that time it has lost 98% of its value. These people are not guardians of our currencies, they are currency-assassins, because it is through the process of dilution that the bankers are able to steal all our wealth. Giving these private central banks monopolies over the creation of our money-supply goes well beyond “allowing the Fox to guard the hen-house”. It is nothing less than giving the Fox ownership of all hen-houses.

As I and other precious metals commentators continue to remind people, there is only one way to protect yourself as the banksters steal your wealth with their (worthless) paper currencies: by converting that wealth from paper to metal – and putting it forever beyond the reach of these confessed thieves.

So the next time you hear someone claiming that a paper currency could “rise in value”, understand that they are directly implying that the currency was worthless to begin with. Or they are just idiots.

 

 


 

Trackback(0)
Comments (9)Add Comment
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, August 01, 2012
The ETFs GDXJ(U.S) and ZJG(Canada) are junior miners that should fly in the long term. I hold both.


Yes Jimha, the precious metals mining-ETF's -- especially those focusing on the smaller-cap miners -- are very good ways to become acquainted with these companies AND a short-cut to holding your own "basket". smilies/smiley.gif
jimha
...
written by jimha, July 31, 2012
SkyPilot

The ETFs GDXJ(U.S) and ZJG(Canada) are junior miners that should fly in the long term. I hold both.
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, July 31, 2012
...I am curious though, since India is offering these "high" rates and further that India is one of the countries whose central banks are stockpiling gold, it seems to me that IF one were to foolishly embark on a program of putting spare paper into their bank (Heaven Forbid), would it not be safer than putting it in to US paper crap, who are Hell-Bent on destroying the entire global economy with greenbacks?

Thanks for the advice on the mining stocks. I will look at the links and proceed accordingly. I have always liked Mining stocks. So much so, that I may even consider buying my own gold mine some day.

I also find it curious that the SWISS banking establishment, who were long known for their disinclination to print money, have now joined the herd. I wonder how safe all that laundered drug money and other forms of ill-gotten criminal gains that are "safely" tucked away from the prying eyes of the revenuers, will fare when the Swiss banks start to fail. It will be a case of one bunch of pirates stealing from the other pirates. No honor among thieves, lol...


SkyPilot you raise several interesting issues, and partially address some of them with your own comments. It's pretty difficult to address them in any sort of comprenhensive manner, so I'll just make a few general remarks.

Between all the money-laundering taking place, "competitive devaluation", AND simply the OCEANS of paper which are flooding the world's markets; we can see almost ANY sort of manifestation of financial insanity on display over the SHORT TERM.

Which (over the slightly longer term) brings us to the old cliche: "a Fool and his money are soon parted." smilies/wink.gif
skypilot1974
...
written by skypilot1974, July 31, 2012
Right you are. Duh! How silly of me. I almost got sucked in again to even consider turning "spare" cash into extra reserves that those pirates can multiply their profits with. I am curious though, since India is offering these "high" rates and further that India is one of the countries whose central banks are stockpiling gold, it seems to me that IF one were to foolishly embark on a program of putting spare paper into their bank (Heaven Forbid), would it not be safer than putting it in to US paper crap, who are Hell-Bent on destroying the entire global economy with greenbacks?

Thanks for the advice on the mining stocks. I will look at the links and proceed accordingly. I have always liked Mining stocks. So much so, that I may even consider buying my own gold mine some day.

I also find it curious that the SWISS banking establishment, who were long known for their disinclination to print money, have now joined the herd. I wonder how safe all that laundered drug money and other forms of ill-gotten criminal gains that are "safely" tucked away from the prying eyes of the revenuers, will fare when the Swiss banks start to fail. It will be a case of one bunch of pirates stealing from the other pirates. No honor among thieves, lol.

In the book by Paul Erdman, I think it was Silver Bears, at the end, the old banker gentleman who had swindled Billions from some pretty ugly people, suddenly found himself attacked by "Terrorists" and his Mercedes fell off a cliff. There could be a lot of bankers getting bumped off when they steal from the wrong people, lol.
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, July 31, 2012
... I have a question. Although I am stacking up as much gold and silver as humanly possible in these Last Days of paper money, usually in the range of about 60% of my portfolio, I like to reserve about 20% of it for high risk investments. I came upon an internet link to an Indian bank, offering up to 9.5% on 5 year and 7.25% interest on 1 year term deposits. Compared to the paltry North American interest rates offered, which takes about 50 years to double my money, I could double my money in a mere 10 years with these guys. Intuitively, I know that 5 years is quite scary and I would only commit a small amount if I did it but what about 1 year, is the risk of currency devaluation too great? And the other side of it is that their Bonds must be worth way more than US Bonds, since they haven't gotten down to zero yet like the US has. I'm just starting to research that now but I know that you will come up with a much faster (and better) answer. What about other currencies, like Brazil, which offers around 11%. I know it's all wheelbarrow currencies but so is the USD, or soon will be, if all those new Trillions find their way into the marketplace. The way I see it, save and except for political risk, the only major risk is the exchange rate going against me at maturity.


SkyPilot, there is simply NO interest rate which can possibly compensate us for the risk of LOCKING our wealth into paper. The principal risk of course is hyperinflation -- which is now nearly INEVITABLE. When the rate of inflation is 1000% or 100,000% or 100,000,000%; your 10% savings rate will (at best) recoup 1% of your losses.

Please read "Crash Warning" to get a better idea of the risks of paper:

http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/gold-commentary/25571-crash-warning

With regard to a paper investment component to go with your bullion holdings, we recommend the gold and silver miners -- for two reasons:

1) They are virtually the only companies which can be expected to be earning "record profits" in the years ahead.

2) When the next big price-shock hits (due to currency dilution) many people will consider bullion simply too expensive, and will be looking for ANOTHER way to get exposure to precious metals. That leaves the miners.

IF people spread out their dollars among a "basket" of these companies (and do their research on these companies), then a basket of quality "junior" and mid-tier producers offers investors MAXIMUM investment potential within acceptable risk parameters.

Currently these companies are nearly at their cheapest level in this entire bull market -- in relation to bullion prices. The only other time that was comparable was right after the Crash of '08.

We offer a multitude of resources to help teach investors to learn how to invest in these miners:

"Education Vault"
http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=12&Itemid=147

"Mining Company Database"
http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/mining-company-database

Our forum:
http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/bulletin-boards
http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/bulletin-boards/10-mining-companies--stocks
http://www.bullionbullscanada.com/bulletin-boards/7-top-picks
skypilot1974
...
written by skypilot1974, July 31, 2012
Jeff: I see you are also a workaholic type just like me, replying to my comments at 11:30 at nite. I appreciate your timely response though. I have a question. Although I am stacking up as much gold and silver as humanly possible in these Last Days of paper money, usually in the range of about 60% of my portfolio, I like to reserve about 20% of it for high risk investments. I came upon an internet link to an Indian bank, offering up to 9.5% on 5 year and 7.25% interest on 1 year term deposits. Compared to the paltry North American interest rates offered, which takes about 50 years to double my money, I could double my money in a mere 10 years with these guys. Intuitively, I know that 5 years is quite scary and I would only commit a small amount if I did it but what about 1 year, is the risk of currency devaluation too great? And the other side of it is that their Bonds must be worth way more than US Bonds, since they haven't gotten down to zero yet like the US has. I'm just starting to research that now but I know that you will come up with a much faster (and better) answer. What about other currencies, like Brazil, which offers around 11%. I know it's all wheelbarrow currencies but so is the USD, or soon will be, if all those new Trillions find their way into the marketplace. The way I see it, save and except for political risk, the only major risk is the exchange rate going against me at maturity.
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, July 30, 2012
I admire your direct verbal characterization of the "Pillars of Society", as being the Pirates that they are. I have been following and buying Gold and Silver since 1974, when Gold was a mere fraction of today's price, at $!96 an ounce. I could actually afford to buy an entire ounce or two back then. I was buying 100 ounce bars of Silver at under $5 an ounce. Oh, for the good old days. Having said that, precious metals are still the Buy of the Century, even at today's higher prices. owing to the hyperinflation that has gone largely un-noticed by the blind sheep. I will continue buying these beautifully colored metals regardless of their prices in terms of worthless shin-plasters, and will be my retirement plan, as the greatest transfer of wealth accelerates. This will be a time that the outwardly stupid fools and welfare bums, with the foresight to buy precious metals NOW will become rich, while the rich bankers and other paper money proponents become poor. Third World countries with the foresight to amass large holdings of Gold and Silver, will be sending aid to the US, once the shit hits the fan on the largest Ponzi Scheme of all time. Sadly, I wish you and I and all other derisively characterized Gold and Silver Bugs, were wrong because it will be a time of great tribulation, civil unrest, violence, and so forth. I just wish there was a little more time to get my holdings up to a comfortable level of a few thousand ounces of Silver and at least 100 ounces of Gold. I've been at it a long time but I have been stupid at times and actually sold the geese that laid the golden eggs.


Thanks for the support SkyPilot! No shame in admitting to some mistakes, the only time we need feel shame is when we don't LEARN from those mistakes (lol). With respect to what I've learned about the precious metals sector, it's 1/2 what I've learned from others and 1/2 what I've learned from my OWN mistakes.

I also fully understand that sentiments that there is nothing for precious metals-holders to "celebrate" here. The line that I generally use is that I don't HOPE that precious metals will soar in price/value -- I fear it...
skypilot1974
...
written by skypilot1974, July 30, 2012
I have just joined your organization and have so far, read 3 of your articles. I could not have written any of them better myself. I admire your direct verbal characterization of the "Pillars of Society", as being the Pirates that they are. I have been following and buying Gold and Silver since 1974, when Gold was a mere fraction of today's price, at $!96 an ounce. I could actually afford to buy an entire ounce or two back then. I was buying 100 ounce bars of Silver at under $5 an ounce. Oh, for the good old days. Having said that, precious metals are still the Buy of the Century, even at today's higher prices. owing to the hyperinflation that has gone largely un-noticed by the blind sheep. I will continue buying these beautifully colored metals regardless of their prices in terms of worthless shin-plasters, and will be my retirement plan, as the greatest transfer of wealth accelerates. This will be a time that the outwardly stupid fools and welfare bums, with the foresight to buy precious metals NOW will become rich, while the rich bankers and other paper money proponents become poor. Third World countries with the foresight to amass large holdings of Gold and Silver, will be sending aid to the US, once the shit hits the fan on the largest Ponzi Scheme of all time. Sadly, I wish you and I and all other derisively characterized Gold and Silver Bugs, were wrong because it will be a time of great tribulation, civil unrest, violence, and so forth. I just wish there was a little more time to get my holdings up to a comfortable level of a few thousand ounces of Silver and at least 100 ounces of Gold. I've been at it a long time but I have been stupid at times and actually sold the geese that laid the golden eggs.
apberusdisvet
...
written by apberusdisvet, July 30, 2012
Jeff: my 2 cents: Dilution/debasement; really no difference with the exception that dilution can be voluntary or out of the control of the policy makers. Debasement, on the other hand is purposeful, and usually agenda driven.

Write comment
You must be logged in to post a comment. Please register if you do not have an account yet.

busy

Latest Commentary

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12

Latest Comments

Disclaimer:

BullionBullsCanada.com is not a registered investment advisor - Stock information is for educational purposes ONLY. Bullion Bulls Canada does not make "buy" or "sell" recommendations for any company. Rather, we seek to find and identify Canadian companies who we see as having good growth potential. It is up to individual investors to do their own "due diligence" or to consult with their financial advisor - to determine whether any particular company is a suitable investment for themselves.

Login Form