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Gold Bears Ignore Supply Contradictions

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As we see gold and silver prices plunge lower (again) today; it becomes an especially good idea to step back, and look at the Big Picture of these markets. Why? Because nothing happened today.

What is the official propaganda today from the Corporate Media on why precious metals prices have fallen?

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said stimulus may be reduced later this year as the economy recovers.

The problem here? B.S. Bernanke (aka “The Boy Who Cried Exit Strategy”) has been saying this every day for 4 ½ years. There was literally not one word that was new. It could have all been copied-and-pasted from one of his 2009 scripts. Simply calling this “news” is a perversion in and of itself. So nothing happened today in bullion markets.

With today’s price-action having no connection with the real world, and with any Bernanke “prediction” of an Exit Strategy having no connection with sanity; it behooves us to look at the actual supply/demand dynamics for bullion markets – something never attempted by the Corporate Media itself.

Here we see yet another fundamental contradiction by the “bears” of the propaganda machine. While we have these Chicken Littles relentlessly making absurd price-predictions for the gold market; these bashers are simultaneously spreading at least as much doom-and-gloom on their “predictions” for the mining companies which supply these metals.

Herein lies the contradiction. You can’t (rationally) be “bearish” on both the price of gold and the supply of gold. If one is low; this implies the other will be higher. More emphatically; you can’t be bearish on both the price and supply of gold at a time when there is already a 1,500+ ton per year supply deficit in this market.

Let me explain the mechanics here, for any/all readers to whom this is not obvious. Let’s start with plummeting prices; precisely what the Banksters have manufactured in bullion markets today. What is the consequence of these lower prices?

To get that answer, we need only refer to the propaganda from Basher Central; more commonly known as Kitco:

…“Everyone thought at $1,600, $1,800 and $1,900 (that) all the mining companies were making profit hand over fist, but the reality is that the capital costs of construction had escalated so signficantly that the margins of production and the margin of operation were still tight,” Gray said.

$1,300 is not a sustainable gold price…”

Let me translate that remarkable statement. When all of these very same gold-bears were writing their drivel about “a gold bubble” for the past four years; they were all lying. Gold priced toward $2,000/oz was nothing more than the minimum price needed to sustain some semblance of health in the gold-mining sector.

And having gotten that much of a mea culpa, we get the remainder of the confession: $1,300/oz is not a “sustainable” price for gold today. Thus we have a collection of Serial Liars acknowledging that informed investors should not have listened to anything they were saying about the gold market over the past four years (at least).

Now these same Serial Liars are “predicting” many dark days (and even lower prices) ahead for the gold market; because the Boy Who Cried Exit Strategy has cried “exit strategy” for the 1,000th time. And we’re supposed to be convinced by this “prediction”; from these esteemed analysts?

But let’s assume that they were correct. In fact, let’s assume that the King of the Buffoons is correct and the price of gold will be manipulated to $1,000/oz. What then?

If the gold-mining industry isn’t sustainable (at all) with gold priced at $1,300/oz; what would happen with gold at $1,000/oz? A collapse in supply…in a market which already has a greater-than-1,500 ton per year supply-deficit. A deficit already 60% greater than annual mine-supply.

 

Yet this is precisely what we see with all of the shrill, irrational gold bears. Out of one side of their mouths, we hear these sages “predicting” much lower sustained prices for gold. Out of the other side of their mouths; we have the bears explaining how most of the companies who produce that gold will be unable to remain in business even at current prices.

How can a market sustain low prices with a large, existing supply-deficit; and supply (supposedly) about to collapse? It can’t. Even when the gold sector was relatively robust and supply was expanding; we had the Banksters acknowledging there was $100 of paper for every dollar of actual, physical gold which existed in those markets.

Even a small decline in physical supply implies that paper-to-gold ratio going to astronomical levels; unless the paper market contracts by a similar 100:1 ratio. Thus any decline at all in mine-supply doesn’t simply create even more extreme supply/demand imbalances on the gold market; it radically increases the leverage (and thus instability) of the Banksters’ entire paper-bullion fraud empire.

It is certainly not gold investors who “cannot withstand” further weakness in the phony, official price for gold (and silver). For us (and two billion people in India and China alone), it simply means being able to buy real metal even cheaper – while supplies last.

It is the bankers (on one “side” of this industry) and the miners (on the other) for whom today’s fantasy prices are not remotely sustainable. Both the Suppliers of gold and the Traders of gold are about to simultaneously experience their own “no mas” moment. That they cannot tolerate the current phony/fraudulent prices for one more day.

And what happens then? What happened in the Spring of 2009; after the last manipulation-insanity had washed over bullion markets? We had the longest/strongest rally of this entire bull market.

Many notable differences exist between that bear-bottom and the present insanity:

1) In 2009; few suspected that Western governments (and their banks) were already insolvent.

2) In 2009; bankers hadn’t yet openly begun stealing paper out of their clients accounts.

3) In 2009; governments hadn’t openly begun stealing bank deposits (and making ominous statements about “precedents” being set).

4) In 2009; gold demand by the Chinese population had just begun to heat up.

5) In 2009; the miners weren’t attempting to endure their second (severe) Depression in five years.

6) In 2009; the Banksters’ paper-fraud market hadn’t already begun to collapse.

7) In 2009; the Banksters hadn’t yet confessed to their $500+ trillion LIBOR fraud.

8) In 2009; we didn’t have the U.S. and EU both simultaneously committing to “unlimited” money-printing.

Note that B.S. Bernanke had previously “promised” the paper-traders to keep his pedal to the metal with his money-printing (and bond-buying) until at least 2015. Which promise are we supposed to believe: his promise to continue the money-printing; or his 1,000th “promise” to slow it down? We know which “Bernanke” Jim Rogers believes.

In short, in 2009 the supply-side of the market was significantly more-robust. Demand had not grown/matured to present levels. And the Banksters (and our own governments) hadn’t even begun to show their “true colours” in terms of stealing any/every paper asset we leave within their grasp.

This means that when the current madness subsides we will have a market with much stronger demand than in 2009, much weaker supply, and where the alternatives to insuring our wealth with bullion have never looked riskier/less-attractive.

Given these obvious parameters; one does not have to be a gold-market analyst to “predict” that the Mother of All Rallies is coming to the gold and silver market when the current, very temporary assault on bullion markets runs its course. Clearly these tortured markets have now been brought to the point of rupture.

Either we will have a near-term explosion higher in gold and silver prices; or we will have a near-term implosion as one or both of these markets suffers some sort of decisive default or “decoupling” event. Either way, prudent bullion-buyers will be buying their (real) bullion sooner rather than later – as “cheaper prices” are not of much good to us if there is no actual metal to be purchased at such prices.

 

 

[Readers are encouraged to join me for my daily dialogue on the gold market – and the events which shape these markets – on The Daily Grind]

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Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, July 06, 2013
Sorry if I'm not doing the quotes right...

Here's my take:
The key to what is the physical price, IS markets like Vietnam, China and India, coin dealers and Ebay!!! The paper gold price is a COMPLETE sham because it is NOT market determined. We keep wishing it to be so, but it ISN'T. A MARKET is defined by what price a buyer and seller are willing to exchange assets>currency, or assets>assets. Your reference to dig price and store price have the common denominator that both are HOLDERS, so they CAN make money on a spread, because what they sell is immediately replaceable from either the ground or a refiner. And that is exactly what they do. First they HOLD, then they replace what they flow at whatever current price exists in the 'market'. If they didn't have & use that replacement mechanism. They would be susceptible to disaster. That's what the futures market is supposed to adapt to, when not manipulated.

I think the banks are simply anticipating their meltdown and manipulating the price so they get ALL the gold and silver they can at the lowest price. What's so hard figuring that out? We just don't want to believe in such an anti-market action, but there really is no other explanation. They CAN, so they ARE.

The key is to have SOME real money PM supply to hold. Continually,buy and sell as needed as the market fluctuates, always replacing with an equal amount at current price. If it bottoms, you have replaced your inventory at low prices; if it tops, dump it all for another desirable asset.

I feel sorry for the bulls who bought at $1900, but the best strategy is/would have been to buy/sell all the way down. Now, they can dollar cost average, and recoup on the way back up. IMHO ))



First a quick technical point for yourself (and other readers). To create the quote "box" for a comment; just click on the ICON in the comment box just to the left of the "Emoticons". You then paste-in the quoted material between the prompts which appear in the box. Your own thoughts then go OUTSIDE of (i.e. below) the quoted material. smilies/wink.gif

Now with regard to the substance of your comments; yes, one could write an entire commentary about the Vietnam gold market alone. It makes the actions of INDIA'S government to suppress gold demand seem "muted" in comparison (lol).

With respect to your general thoughts on the market, most of them have been echoed in my own commentaries. I see "decoupling" as a very realistic alternative to formal inventory-default -- as it provides the Banksters with more opportunity to cover-up their bullion fraud.

One day we simply stop talking about "premims", and begin (openly) talking about TWO, separate "precious metals markets": the REAL (physical) markets, and the dying paper-fraud markets of the banksters. The new opening of Singapore's "physical" gold/silver EXCHANGE could represent another step in this Decoupling.

Regarding the pain people are feeling with the TEMPORARY decline in prices; it's especially rough for those who only came into the market AFTER the Crash of '08 slaughter. This is their first taste of adversity.

For those of us who have been in the sector longer; and ESPECIALLY those of us holding shares in the miners, the phrase "averaging down" inevitably becomes a permanent part of our vocabulary (lol)...but ALSO a formula for success.

smilies/cheesy.gif
EpluribusUNO
...
written by EpluribusUNO, July 05, 2013
My first post here. Sorry if I'm not doing the quotes right. ((

written by George Silver, June 23, 2013
Dear Jeff,
I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to get a number PM sites to answer what should be a simple question:-
"What is the break-even retail price of a 1 oz.Krugerrand or Gold Eagle?"
I get a lot of complex answers but no one has of yet stepped up to the plate and answered the question.
Many say it doesn't matter to the coin-dealer what the price is as he just lives-off the spread. This is patently untrue if the cost of digging the stuff out of the ground is higher than the spot price or the retail price.
No company (unless subsidised by the government) stays in business long if the "retail price" is lower than the "cost price".
So with the cost of digging Gold out of the ground added to the manufacture and distribution of a nice new Krugerrand there MUST be a break-even retail price of the coin.
Once we know this then we will know when the supply of Gold coins will disappear from the market.
Have you any idea?

Here's my take:
The key to what is the physical price, IS markets like Vietnam, China and India, coin dealers and Ebay!!! The paper gold price is a COMPLETE sham because it is NOT market determined. We keep wishing it to be so, but it ISN'T. A MARKET is defined by what price a buyer and seller are willing to exchange assets>currency, or assets>assets. Your reference to dig price and store price have the common denominator that both are HOLDERS, so they CAN make money on a spread, because what they sell is immediately replaceable from either the ground or a refiner. And that is exactly what they do. First they HOLD, then they replace what they flow at whatever current price exists in the 'market'. If they didn't have & use that replacement mechanism. They would be susceptible to disaster. That's what the futures market is supposed to adapt to, when not manipulated.

I think the banks are simply anticipating their meltdown and manipulating the price so they get ALL the gold and silver they can at the lowest price. What's so hard figuring that out? We just don't want to believe in such an anti-market action, but there really is no other explanation. They CAN, so they ARE.

The key is to have SOMEreal money PM supply to hold. Continually,buy and sell as needed as the market fluctuates, always replacing with an equal amount at current price. If it bottoms, you have replaced your inventory at low prices; if it tops, dump it all for another desirable asset.

I feel sorry for the bulls who bought at $1900, but the best strategy is/would have been to buy/sell all the way down. Now, they can dollar cost average, and recoup on the way back up. IMHO ))
apberusdisvet
...
written by apberusdisvet, June 25, 2013
Jeff: in response to Alexander, might I add that the bankster controlled Silver Institute disingenuously counts all minted coins and silver bullion in the hands of investors as "available supply". So according to them, there will never be a silver supply deficit even though the USGS states that silver will be the first metal to disappear from the planet. But, of course, the question is at what price will I release my stash?
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 25, 2013
...I've learned that, in respect of supply, one of the key distinctions between silver and gold is that one is a flow and the other a stock.

Most of the silver ever mined, outside jewelry (which has a price far in excess of its metal), is spent and gone. So the annual supply of silver is a flow - whatever is added by mining and scrapping in one year, basically.

In contrast, most of the gold ever mined is still available, in central banks, private vaults, jewelry, private stashes. The annual mining may add some 2,000 tons to the existing 150,000 tons or so. The supply is a stock, about 152,000 tons, if you will.

With that in mind, when your article claims that there is a 1,500+ gold ton deficit annually, it seems you are assuming that the previously mined and still available 150,000 tons are somehow not part of the supply curve. While they may not be supplied at current price points, they may well be at higher price points, and I'd say they are part of the supply.

I am inclined to conclude that a price explosion has more foundation in silver than in gold. The supply deficit in silver, as a flow, has no mitigating in any substantial, pre-existing stock.

Indeed, a large part of the reason that manipulators can control the gold market is just this massive, pre-existing supply (eg. leasing gold from central banks). With that, I believe that there is no fundamental for a price explosion in gold, until the manipulators decide for one.


Thanks for your support Alexander Del Mar, and some keen observations in your comment.

Yes, with gold we have the paradigm of massive stockpiles; while with silver depletion of stockpiles means it is all about "flow". However, it would be inaccurate to say I "ignore" this dynamic. Rather, it is more an issue of needing to retain focus and avoid tangents when writing individual commentaries -- and you can't cover all angles in any one commentary.

Because of this; I actively respond to questions AND often use the questions/comments of readers as "inspiration" for future commentaries. Indeed, this particular dynamic you raise could probably fuel an entire commentary by itself. smilies/wink.gif

Yes, gold has massive stockpiles in existence; BUT not nearly as massive as portrayed by the Corporate Media (and this is something I HAVE addressed in prior commentaries). Much of those stockpiles are in the form of cultural/religious artifacts and family heirlooms, such gold is unlikely to ever come onto the market -- at any price.

Beyond this we have the OTHER fundamental distinction between gold and silver. Silver is the metal of the People; but gold is the money of GOVERNMENTS and the Wealthy.

If we put aside the aberration of the gold-dumping of the 1990's and early years of this century; we can then chop off another dramatic chunk of global stockpiles in terms of what governments NEED to hold, and the Wealthy WANT to hold.

Once we have done that, then suddenly a 1,500+ ton/year deficit takes on much, much greater significance -- especially given the additional dynamic of supply attrition on the mining side of the equation. smilies/wink.gif

NOW consider how much gold governments would "need" to hold and how much the Wealthy would "want" to hold in some System-ending crisis. It's a much smaller world than one might believe when contemplating EITHER the available stockpiles of gold or silver, and there is potential for both to appreciate in phenomenal terms in relation to other assets.
Alexander Del Mar
...
written by Alexander Del Mar, June 25, 2013
Greetings, Jeff, I've just discovered your writings and started to enjoy them, sensing their high quality, after years of reading widely on the gold/silver markets and on monetary history.

Now, I've learned that, in respect of supply, one of the key distinctions between silver and gold is that one is a flow and the other a stock.

Most of the silver ever mined, outside jewelry (which has a price far in excess of its metal), is spent and gone. So the annual supply of silver is a flow - whatever is added by mining and scrapping in one year, basically.

In contrast, most of the gold ever mined is still available, in central banks, private vaults, jewelry, private stashes. The annual mining may add some 2,000 tons to the existing 150,000 tons or so. The supply is a stock, about 152,000 tons, if you will.

With that in mind, when your article claims that there is a 1,500+ gold ton deficit annually, it seems you are assuming that the previously mined and still available 150,000 tons are somehow not part of the supply curve. While they may not be supplied at current price points, they may well be at higher price points, and I'd say they are part of the supply.

I am inclined to conclude that a price explosion has more foundation in silver than in gold. The supply deficit in silver, as a flow, has no mitigating in any substantial, pre-existing stock.

Indeed, a large part of the reason that manipulators can control the gold market is just this massive, pre-existing supply (eg. leasing gold from central banks). With that, I believe that there is no fundamental for a price explosion in gold, until the manipulators decide for one.
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 23, 2013
I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to get a number PM sites to answer what should be a simple question:-
"What is the break-even retail price of a 1 oz.Krugerrand or Gold Eagle?"
I get a lot of complex answers but no one has of yet stepped up to the plate and answered the question.
Many say it doesn't matter to the coin-dealer what the price is as he just lives-off the spread. This is patently untrue if the cost of digging the stuff out of the ground is higher than the spot price or the retail price.
No company (unless subsidised by the government) stays in business long if the "retail price" is lower than the "cost price".
So with the cost of digging Gold out of the ground added to the manufacture and distribution of a nice new Krugerrand there MUST be a break-even retail price of the coin.
Once we know this then we will know when the supply of Gold coins will disappear from the market.

Have you any idea?


George Silver, one of the reasons you get "a lot of answers" to your question is because there are different ways of estimating that metric.

"Cash costs" are the basic operating costs to dig and process an ounce of gold. At the moment, that figure averages somewhere close to $1,000/oz for the industry -- excepting the occasional high-grade mines (with dwindling ore) which can produce at much lower costs.

But there are lots of additional financial/administrative costs for operating a mine. When we add in the FULL operating costs of these mining companies then we go to a figure several hundred dollars per ounce higher.

In the article I cited, a figure of $1300+ was used as an estimate. But that doesn't cover the FULL costs of sustaining the entire gold-mining sector -- which also includes a large number of pure exploration companies.

These are the "feeder companies" which BEGIN the production chain for many of the worlds deposits -- especially smaller ones. THEY require a high enough price to be able to finance their operations at viable share-price levels.

BECAUSE the Banksters have been relentlessly shorting these companies (to the greatest extreme in history); we now require a price of gold somewhere approaching $2,000 -- in order to beat-back the Shorts sufficiently that these Junior Explorers can properly finance their operations.

Thus the "real cost" of producing gold RISES with the degree of severity with which the Banksters attack the sector. If their shorting got even more extreme/criminal; then it might require $2,500/oz to sustain the industry.

What this means is there is no single "price" to use in answering your question. So I can't give you "one number" either (lol); but hopefully I've helped to clarify WHY your question isn't as simple/easy as you might have thought. smilies/wink.gif
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 23, 2013
Excellent article Jeff. As a holder of both PMs and their miners, I have been taking punches to the gut these past months. I have no intention of selling anything, but this environment does make it discouraging to think of purchasing new stock, when you are in danger of catching a falling knife.

I find myself with little excess cash at this junction, otherwise I might be more inclined to scoop up bargains. Yet years if enduring this kind of manipulation have eroded my once resolute stance on this question at hand.
I enjoy using my vacations to go traveling, and so am saving up for the next flight and hotel bills. Will be instructive to take the pulse of Europe once again after 4 years away.



Dalkrin, such sentiments are normal...but it doesn't mean we shouldn't fight them, nonetheless (lol).

We are dealing with Bullies. And one of the tactics which you expect with Bullies is INTIMIDATION. Indeed, the ferocity with which the Bullies have attempted to drive us out of our PM holdings suggests one of two motives -- if not both:

a) Their fear (in GENERAL) of people holding precious metals is even greater than most of us realize.

b) They are PARTICULARLY desperate at the moment, because of rapid inventory-depletion.

If we are UN-leveraged; then we suffer nothing from such episodes other than psychological angst. It is the BANKSTERS who are watching their precious bullion inventories (of real metal) disappearing before their eyes.
georgesilver
...
written by George Silver, June 23, 2013
Dear Jeff,
I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to get a number PM sites to answer what should be a simple question:-
"What is the break-even retail price of a 1 oz.Krugerrand or Gold Eagle?"
I get a lot of complex answers but no one has of yet stepped up to the plate and answered the question.
Many say it doesn't matter to the coin-dealer what the price is as he just lives-off the spread. This is patently untrue if the cost of digging the stuff out of the ground is higher than the spot price or the retail price.
No company (unless subsidised by the government) stays in business long if the "retail price" is lower than the "cost price".
So with the cost of digging Gold out of the ground added to the manufacture and distribution of a nice new Krugerrand there MUST be a break-even retail price of the coin.
Once we know this then we will know when the supply of Gold coins will disappear from the market.

Have you any idea?
Dalkrin
...
written by Dalkrin, June 22, 2013
Excellent article Jeff. As a holder of both PMs and their miners, I have been taking punches to the gut these past months. I have no intention of selling anything, but this environment does make it discouraging to think of purchasing new stock, when you are in danger of catching a falling knife.

I find myself with little excess cash at this junction, otherwise I might be more inclined to scoop up bargains. Yet years if enduring this kind of manipulation have eroded my once resolute stance on this question at hand.
I enjoy using my vacations to go traveling, and so am saving up for the next flight and hotel bills. Will be instructive to take the pulse of Europe once again after 4 years away.
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 22, 2013
Something I wondered about is if the miners are selling their product at COMEX prices or are getting a premium. That article showing 10,000 Chinese lined up for gold said that the regular price was up to 370 yuan/gram which was more than 30% above COMEX at the time.


No Jimha, the Miners are bigger Chumps than we are. They sit back quietly and TAKE this manipulation year after year, and the only time they DON'T sell at the (phony) spot prices is when they "hedge" their production -- and sell it even CHEAPER...
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 22, 2013
All pure silver miners are in a world of hurt. If current prices fall further or even stay in a range of $2 even for a 6 month period, many will have to file Chapter. Even SLW has a problem; it paid 1/2 billion to Barrick for future production at the now abandoned Pasca Loma. And whom do think will pick up the pieces, specifically in North America? Hmmm. Do Blythe Jamie and Lloyd ring a bell?



Yes Apberusdisvet, the banksters are scavengers who LOVE buying prized assets at pennies on the dollar. But how would they profit from buying silver mines? Only through much higher prices.

I'm sure that INDIVIDUALLY there are bankers scooping-up the shares of miners at these criminal prices; but the banks themselves CAN'T AFFORD to make money on these investments. smilies/wink.gif
jimha
...
written by jimha, June 22, 2013
Something I wondered about is if the miners are selling their product at COMEX prices or are getting a premium. That article showing 10,000 Chinese lined up for gold said that the regular price was up to 370 yuan/gram which was more than 30% above COMEX at the time.
apberusdisvet
...
written by apberusdisvet, June 21, 2013
Jeff: in re Jimha's comments:

All pure silver miners are in a world of hurt. If current prices fall further or even stay in a range of $2 even for a 6 month period, many will have to file Chapter. Even SLW has a problem; it paid 1/2 billion to Barrick for future production at the now abandoned Pasca Loma. And whom do think will pick up the pieces, specifically in North America? Hmmm. Do Blythe Jamie and Lloyd ring a bell?
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 21, 2013
I don't know why the miners (especially silver) just do not halt production until sanity returns to prices. Perhaps with a ton of unemployed miners walking around some state capitals pressure could be brought to bear on all this nonsense.


Jimha, the argument itself certainly makes sense. That was precisely the thinking behind OPEC: RESTRICT production unless/until buyers were willing to pay "reasonable" prices for crude -- after Nixon launched us into an era of purely fiat-currencies.

The problem is that these miners have "trapped" themselves. For fear of upsetting their shareholders; they REFUSE to discuss market-manipulation. Thus (in their world) a sub-$20/oz price for silver is the "correct" price -- because this is what the market decrees (today).

However, after the Survivors emerge from the CURRENT "scorched-Earth" tactics of the banksters; one has to wonder if they will finally start to think about living in the real world -- and directly confronting the crimes of the Banksters.

As it stands now; the Junior Miners are simply a bunch of "rape victims" who REFUSE to shout "rape"...

jimha
...
written by jimha, June 21, 2013
I don't know why the miners (especially silver) just do not halt production until sanity returns to prices. Perhaps with a ton of unemployed miners walking around some state capitals pressure could be brought to bear on all this nonsense.
Jeff Nielson
...
written by Jeff Nielson, June 20, 2013
The bears won't (disingenuously) recognize the supply deficit signs that have already occurred (the Dutch bank, the MFG theft to steal gold and silver to prevent a COMEX default, and the 7 year German repatriation of just 300 tonnes absurdity). In addition, there are many anecdotal stories about lawsuits in Switzerland from clients with allocated gold that have been told to shove it and take cash instead. I would imagine that a true audit of Ft Knox would be interesting, not so much that any gold still existing there might be hypothecated to a fare-thee-well, but whether there is actually any left. Speaking of which, btw, what's to prevent the Canadian Government from confiscating the CEF or any of the Sprott funds?



Sadly, Apberusdisvet, you're quite right that the Banksters and media talking-heads are deliberately disingenuous in feigning "ample supplies" (while frantically trying to restrict Indian gold demand - lol).

This is all being done so they can feign "surprise" when some market-rupturing event does occur. This is why we must DOCUMENT the lies being spread now -- and (equally important) remember them when the Banksters and media attempt to re-write History.

With respect to the confiscation issue; even LEGITIMATE bullion-funds have no defense against such an official decree. This is why I simply/absolutely recommend "physical bullion" (only) to readers.

I obviously bear no ill-will to the CEF Funds or Sprott offerings. However; being one of those commentators who views confiscation as a serious threat EVERYWHERE in the West; I view the physical possession of bullion as our least-worst option -- no matter what the Banksters (temporarily) do to bullion prices.
apberusdisvet
...
written by apberusdisvet, June 20, 2013
The bears won't (disingenuously) recognize the supply deficit signs that have already occurred (the Dutch bank, the MFG theft to steal gold and silver to prevent a COMEX default, and the 7 year German repatriation of just 300 tonnes absurdity). In addition, there are many anecdotal stories about lawsuits in Switzerland from clients with allocated gold that have been told to shove it and take cash instead. I would imagine that a true audit of Ft Knox would be interesting, not so much that any gold still existing there might be hypothecated to a fare-thee-well, but whether there is actually any left. Speaking of which, btw, what's to prevent the Canadian Government from confiscating the CEF or any of the Sprott funds?

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