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Monetizing Silver: Instant Prosperity

Articles & Blogs - Silver Commentary

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For well over a year, we have been forced to listen to “economic experts”, media talking-heads, and government “leaders” yammering on and on about “currency wars” or “trade wars” – and all because people who know nothing about economics are wailing about how the value of their money isn’t falling fast enough.

In this insane world, serial inflationists like “Helicopter” Ben Bernanke are deemed to be the “winners”, since they are destroying their national currency the fastest. For those who are sickened by continuing to listen to their own governments lament about not destroying our wealth fast enough, let me recommend “taking a vacation” – in the real world.

In the “real world”, people don’t want their money to be worth less and less and less (and eventually nothing), they want it to be worth more. In the real world, it is considered a tremendous advantage for one’s currency to appreciate in value.

Over the past several months, Hugo Salinas Price has trumpeted the growing “political movement” in Mexico to partially “re-monetize” silver – as a parallel currency to the current banker-paper (i.e. the peso). Indeed, commentator Ben Davies speculated that this factor alone would send the price of silver soaring higher, as yet another incremental source of demand (in a world where silver stockpiles are gone).

While no one has been talking about fully re-monetizing silver in any particular economy, I thought it was time that someone presented this scenario (at least in hypothetical terms) – as a means of countering the wave of nonsensical propaganda that devaluing one’s currency was “the path to prosperity”.

Since hypothetical examples are always most illustrative when we plug-in extreme parameters, let’s assume that Mexico had already re-monetized silver – and had done so at $3.60/oz, a 600-year low for the price of silver. With silver now at $36/oz (and soaring rapidly), the citizens of Mexico would have seen their money increase in value by a factor of ten, over the past 15 years.


In the eyes of all the “experts” (telling us all to “devalue” our currencies as fast as we can), this would be seen as an economic catastrophe. However, since we are “vacationing” in the real world, let’s analyze what would really have happened to Mexico’s economy had it re-monetized silver at less than $4/oz.

To begin with, while all other nations are gripped in an inflationary panic from exploding commodity prices (as expressed in worthless banker-paper), the citizens of Mexico would be laughing about commodity prices – such as paying (once converted to banker-paper) $11/barrel for oil (as of the up-to-the-minute price).

While holders of banker-paper have seen the price they must pay for gold soar by nearly a factor of six, Mexico’s silver-holders would be buying-up gold at the equivalent of about $140/oz – slightly more than half the price of gold when it was at its multi-decade “bottom” in its own price. All other commodities (including vital food products) would be so cheap that Mexicans would be likely unaware that those prices had increased at all.

Naturally, the much cheaper prices for raw materials also equates to much cheaper prices for all finished goods. Thus from automobiles to refrigerators to entire houses, everything would be much, much cheaper for Mexicans. Much like the holders of once-valuable Western currencies could strut around the globe “living like kings”once they had converted their currencies into the cheap paper of poorer nations, it would be the citizens of Mexico who would instantly become the world’s new “kings”.

Hold on there!” protest the ‘experts’. “You’re conveniently leaving out the mechanics of trade in your analysis,” they accuse. So let’s take a closer look at international trade.

At first glance, we might have pause for concern. With Mexican labour now the most expensive/best paid on the planet, who will buy their goods so they can “afford” to buy all of those dirt-cheap imports?

First the instant arithmetic: with all foreign imported goods costing 1/10th their previous price, Mexico could see it’s own exports plummet by 90% - and still be able to “afford” all they were buying before. The difference is that they would only have to surrender 1/10th as many goods (priced in their own currency) to acquire those products.

Furthermore, the stunted intellects of the “experts” leave them incapable of understanding the dynamics of such economics. While everything that Mexican workers buy would only cost 1/10th their previous amount, the wages paid out by employers would have remained the same (momentarily).

Obviously, Mexican employers would immediately start demanding wage-cuts from the workers. Note that if they cut the pay of their workers by even  80%, those workers would still be twice as affluent as they were before silver was re-monetized. Thus while there would be some grumbling, the overall arithmetic would still be extremely favorable for the Mexican worker – and even more so as his “falling wages” (in nominal terms) pushed him down into a much lower tax-bracket.

In other words, we have been brainwashed (by bankers) into believing that the only “mechanism” for ensuring some sort of (mythical) “economic equilibrium” is a world of permanent inflation structured into our economies (i.e. excessive money-printing of banker-paper). This is a total lie. In fact, deflationary dynamics work much, much, much, much better than inflationary dynamics at creating economic equilibrium, since they produce sustainable economic parameters – rather than simply an endless succession of banker Ponzi-schemes, followed by horrific “crashes” as each one bursts.

Lastly, the need/benefits of “foreign trade” have been grossly distorted by the economic charlatans. Understand the concept (the only one) which validates international trade: “comparitive advantage”. This refers to the fact that some nations (whether due to efficiency or natural advantage) can produce certain goods more cheaply than other nations.

The way that international trade is supposed to work is that (naturally) nations only seek to export goods which they can produce “more efficiently”. In reality the incompetent clowns who run our economies have flooded global trade with ridiculously subsidized goods. There are too many negative implications of such folly to even list them all – let alone properly explain them. But here’s a start.

First, much of what is exported today is sold at a net loss – this is known as “dumping”. That is, when we factor in direct subsidies, indirect subsidies, and tax-breaks, there is less-than-zero economic benefit for every unit exported. Heavily-subsidized U.S. agricultural products are a perfect example of this phenomenon.

The U.S. government has showered the agricultural sector with lavish hand-outs, including squandering most of the U.S.’s “water reserves”, (as usual) leaving little-to-nothing for the people. Meanwhile, Ben Bernanke and Tim Geithner scheme to destroy the U.S. dollar even faster – so that the U.S. agricultural sector can sell yet more goods at a loss.

Because prices for goods are see-sawing back and forth erratically (due to the global markets being flooded with new banker-paper), there will be brief intervals where such trade can seem “profitable”. However, converting the U.S. economy from a manufacturing power-house to a “banana republic” has been a pure money-loser – as evidenced by the overall collapse of the U.S. economy.

Thus, rather than strengthening our economies and raising our standards of living, much/most international trade is weakening our economies, and lowering our standard of living. Now let’s return to the concept of “comparative advantage”.

I submit that a nation which is able to buy oil, gold, base metals, food products and everything else at 1/10th the cost of other nations will have a pretty large “comparative advantage” in making and selling all sorts of finished products.

Even if that didn’t occur internationally, such dynamics would certainly occur within the Mexican economy. While exports to other nations would certainly suffer, the trade-off is that Mexican manufacturers would be selling their goods to the world’s most-affluent consumers and paying for their production inputs at 1/10th what non-Mexican manufacturers would pay.

Obviously the “comparative advantages” of trade within such an economy are enormous. Of course we don’t have to view this scenario as totally “hypothetical”. As I’ve written before, we have a previous precedent for a “high-wage” economy, with a “high-value” currency – and which also still managed to be a manufacturing power-house: the United States. Indeed, the U.S. economy reached its all-time peak in prosperity at the time when the U.S. dollar was at its peak in value versus other currencies and when the wages paid to U.S. workers were at the highest level in global economic history.

Everything we have been told about a  “low dollar” and “low wages” leading to economic prosperity for the U.S. (or any other nation) has been all lies. In fact, each time the U.S. dollar takes another dip versus other currencies, the U.S. trade balance gets worse not better – as the soaring cost for imported oil grossly overshadows the increased revenues which this banana republic brings in from soy beans or cotton.

Worse still for this banana-republic, the corporate agriculture model created by the U.S. government is an oil-intensive industry, gobbling-up vast amounts of limited global production. This means that we could never see an extended period of time where “profits” from agriculture exports actually paid for more oil imports. The U.S. has entrenched itself in an economic “vicious circle” which must lead to its own annihilation.

We have now reached the pinnacle of global, economic insanity. Intellectually-bankrupt governments race against each other to see which can destroy its own currency the fastest – in order to prop-up an international trade paradigm which is losing money (on a net basis).

As is true in most facets of our economy, the optimal economic policies are to do the exact opposite of everything recommended by “experts”. They say “destroy our currencies”, I say “make our money better-than-ever”. They say “trade or die”, I say we must refuse to “die by trade”.

To this point, I have only made my case by looking at a positive example of what happens when we increase the value of our currency (and then allow the natural economic advantages produced by that dynamic to flow through our economies). Some time in the near future I intend to present readers with the opposite dynamic: how destroying the silver-based monetary systems of the world’s two most-populous economies was the real cause of “the Great Depression”.

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Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, November 28, 2012
Any work been done on establishing a private (trade or bank) initiative to trade in silver coins e.g. US Constitution allows for silver and gold coins as legal tender.


Yes Jaimeoperez, I know of at least one U.S. state where someone tried to produce silver coins and use them for commerce. And IMMEDIATELY the U.S. government took the company to court -- arguing it was criminally infringing on the government's MONOPOLY to create money.

The bankers (and other Oligarchs) will NOT make it easy for us to use good money... smilies/sad.gif
jaimeoperez
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written by jaimeoperez, November 28, 2012
Any work been done on establishing a private (trade or bank) initiative to trade in silver coins e.g. US Constitution allows for silver and gold coins as legal tender.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 18, 2011
Yes, Suscriber, now you're "seeing the light" here. It becomes OFFICIAL "money" (thus no phony "capital gains"), it can never LOSE value, AND (given that status) it will be much more widely purchased by the people than our semi-official "legal tender" coins - with their bogus "face values".

Beyond that, Salinas Price wants banks to be able to accept these silver coins as deposits - but NOT require them to pay any interest. Then your response would be "who in their right mind would ever deposit their silver with a bank if they would be paid no interest?"

And my response would be "precisely".
0
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written by subscriber, March 18, 2011
Oooooh! I thought of another one. I suppose if the Libertad is official money, than there is no capital gains tax when you spend or sell it. In fact there is no difference between spending and selling. Wow, that would really draw people in, if true. The investment that gained 80% last year is also untaxable, guaranteed not to fall in price, and spendable everywhere should you so choose. No wonder the idea takes so much flak. If you're not taking any flak, you're not over the target!
0
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written by subscriber, March 18, 2011
Jeff, you'll get no argument from me. But people can already buy and save silver coins, so what is the value added with Price's proposal.

Is it maybe that they always could spend them if they wanted, at a published rate, without having to go sell them to a coin dealer first? And they are "guaranteed" not to go down in price, just in case somebody plays games with the price of silver? This is sounding better to me now. Am I getting warmer?
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 18, 2011
Subscriber, this is the BEAUTY of Salinas Price's proposal: not one, single Libertad ever needs to "circulate" (i.e. be spent and re-spent) for these coins to accomplish their true purpose: protecting our SAVINGS (from theft through dilution).

Paper money is just fine as a tool of commerce. Where it is a complete failure (and where it was DESIGNED to fail) was as as "a store of value". Mexicans will SPEND their paper, and SAVE their silver.

Note the most important aspect to this. It is when we DEPOSIT our savings with the banksters that their "fractional-reserve magic" takes place: essentially "printing" nine new dollars for every dollar we deposit.

If we DON'T deposit our wealth, but instead HOLD IT (ourselves) in silver (or gold), we begin to "drain the swamp": an ever smaller proportion of our wealth is exposed to the banksters, and thus they can only steal from those foolish enough to KEEP their savings in paper instruments (such as bonds).
0
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written by subscriber, March 18, 2011
As I understand Price's Mexican proposal, the one ounce Libertad (undenominated in terms of debt money) will circulate. The Mexican government published an official value for the Libertad, which can change from time to time. If the debt money price of silver has risen, the published value of the Libertad will rise in proportion. But if the debt money price of silver has fallen, then the Libertad published value remains the same. So there is a ratchet mechanism such that the Libertad is a Can't Lose proposition for those who own them. I can easily see why this would encourage people to buy them.

What I don't get is why these coins will circulate at all. If I was a Mexican, I would buy and hold Libertads, and pay all my bills with the debt money currency. Why would I want to spend an appreciating asset when I can just as well spend a depreciating asset (debt money)? This sounds a lot like what LBJ told us back in 1965: "Don't worry, the new copper coins will circulate right alongside the old 90% silver." But in fact people kept the silver and spent the copper.

So, I must be missing something with Price's plan.

To me, the problem always has been Gresham's Law: Bad money drives out good money. As long as people have the option of paying their bills with debt money, they will do so. It is the legal tender laws mandating that this official debt money can extinguish debt (Huh?) which are the source of the trouble. I don't see how Price's proposal addresses this problem.
Brian Boutilier
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written by Brian Boutilier, March 10, 2011
Well Sir Jeff, you've been drilling on this strike for quite a while, nice to see the big numbers coming back. Looks like you struck the proverbial "mother load" with this article. I think bringing silver/money/value back to the people is something that we all hope for. We "The People", not necessarily we "the Cabaligarchs". Well done sir, well done.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 08, 2011
Bobbbny, Salinas Price is quite adamant that there are STILL strong elements of INTEGRITY in Mexico's political system. This is VERY important as without overwhelming corruption there must be a PLAUSIBLE argument for rejecting the partial re-monetization of silver in a CULTURE with one of the STRONGEST attachments to the Metal of the Moon.

None of the "arguments" you postulated has any RELEVANCE to the PARTIAL re-monetization of silver - specifically if NO ONE wants to hold/use the coins then there would be absolutely NO CHANGE to the status quo.

It is IMPOSSIBLE to INVENT any objection to such a plan. Understand the bankers are clowns, and anything but omnipotent. Without OVERWHELMING force backing them they are completely impotent.

I repeat: the ONLY way the bankers could contrive an "argument" against Salinas Price's proposal is to TELL THE TRUTH about their stealing. They can't do that - and so they are IMPOTENT in this scenario.

bobbbny
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written by bobbbny, March 08, 2011
Jeff, Of course I have read all the posts, & have read & discussed Salinas proposal before. Yes, it is brilliant, and yes, as you say, it is an existential threat to the bankster cabal.
That is why I believe they would oppose it with their dying breath.
You write:

I marvel at his BRILLIANCE precisely BECAUSE he has come up with a plan which is impossible to oppose by the bankers without REVEALING their own schemes to rob us with their paper.

I believe you are underestimating the extent to which they will lie, supply disinformation, and come up with schemes that will not reveal their true intentions.
They will point at "speculators", they will parade "economists" on television to refute "the barbarous relic", they will testify that global trade will collapse & we will face a depression the likes of which we have never seen.
They will scare the sheeple away from this rational, well thought out plan, and back into their trap.
I never underestimate the will & power of these fascists.
My evidence:
JFK coup d'etat.
Gulf of Tonkin.
Diem.
Allende.
Shah of Iran.
Panama.
Serbia.
Iraq.
The attack on the USS Liberty.
WMD.
9/11.

Need I continue?
My only cynicism with respect to the Salinas proposal is that it would be allowed to happen.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 08, 2011
Yes Bobbbny, it would be useful in almost any analysis (especially current ones) to include the enormous "energy myths" which are still causing most of the sheep to remain apathetic about the fundamentals here.

However, regarding your cynicism of Hugo Salinas Price's proposal to PARTIALLY re-monetize silver, I strongly recommend you dive into MORE of the materials posted on the forum.

I marvel at his BRILLIANCE precisely BECAUSE he has come up with a plan which is impossible to oppose by the bankers without REVEALING their own schemes to rob us with their paper.

Understand that IF you believe in the world of banker-paper, as the bankers have PROGRAMMED us to look at it, then the PARTIAL re-monetization of silver CANNOT be seen as a "threat" to them in any way. It's only IF one understands precisely how they do their stealing that it can be seen how this is actually an "existential threat" to the banking cabal.

Magnificent!
bobbbny
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written by bobbbny, March 08, 2011
Jeff, another excellent commentary on the headlong drive by the banksters to destroy the global economic system! Well summed up in your quote:

"We have now reached the pinnacle of global, economic insanity. Intellectually-bankrupt governments race against each other to see which can destroy its own currency the fastest – in order to prop-up an international trade paradigm which is losing money (on a net basis)."

This of course is why the Hugo Salinas Price proposal will never see the light of day. The banksters will never allow a threat to their Ponzi scheme.
I am amazed by how many educated people believe that the US has plenty of untapped oil, constrained only by "tree huggers" who won't allow drilling. They think there are 5 Saudi Arabias in the Baaken Shale, ignorant of the "energy in to get energy out" equation. They don't see the ethynol program for the polital bribe to industrial farming companies that it is. They don't understand that farm subsidies have consequences like the destruction of the Haitian economy, to name one small example. They don't see the food inflation we have unleashed by this madness as the cause for global unrest.
The Chinese have announced a 10 year, $160 billion program to subsidize and escalate production of solar energy. Where is our program? T. Boone Pickens has a terrific plan to convert our fleet of 18 wheelers to natural gas. Who cares?

The American people believe that our "leaders" are doing all they can to combat the "forces of evil" in the world that are conspiring against us. High oil prices are because of corrupt muslim America haters, not because of us. Our corporations must have lower taxes to be competative. The dollar must go lower to stimulate exports.

You are right. This is the pinnacle of global, economic insanity.

The banksters will not stop until they have destroyed every economy & emerged as the One Global Power, completely in charge of all money and commerce. Gold and silver will not stand in their way. Ideas like HSP's will never be allowed to take root.
I am beginning to feel that you may be correct in your thoughts on confiscation. They can confuse the people, scare the people, herd the people into obedience, but they will never allow a rational idea like this threaten their drive for global domination.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 08, 2011
Great graphic in that link Null!

It's ESPECIALLY illuminating when we ADD the amount of fossile-fuel hand-outs AND the massive subsidies for the U.S.'s corn-ethanol scam.

You are quite right that when it comes to creating equilibrium in markets that the "stick" (higher taxes) always works better than the "carrot" (subsidies). However, in the U.S.'s Ponzi-scheme economy, only SUBSIDIES create more Ponzi-schemes so subsidies is all they use.

This has TOTALLY negated all "conservation efforts" by ALL other nations around the world (through their OWN higher energy taxes). However, while the U.S. has simply "free-loaded" off of the rest of the world all these years (and laughed at these nations behind their backs) THEY now all have more energy-efficient societies/economies.

This means the REAL "price shock" coming from much higher oil prices will HAMMER the U.S. economy somewhere around 5 times as badly as any other developed nation. This is WHY sabotaging the oil market is even MORE of an obsession with the U.S. government than sabotaging the gold or silver markets.

Very high oil prices will QUICKLY vaporize the entire U.S. economy...
Null
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written by Null, March 08, 2011
I haven't been able to buy silver Maple Leafs for about a month, the currency exchange keeps saying they will be in in 2 to 4 weeks. I was able to pick up some 10 ounce bars last week, surprisingly. I read that the mints have now stopped production of silver coins as all that metal is needed in the SLV and Comex to keep that fraud going through this delivery month of March.

On another topic, here is a link showing how much fossil fuels are subsidized in comparison to renewable energy sources. There is some disagreement about the validity of making the comparison on a kW-hr basis vs. a total dollar value but it does make for an interesting comparison. It shows where our leaders' intentions lie in terms of moving our societies towards something sustainable and equitable.

http://www.good.is/post/transparency-how-much-does-the-united-states-subsidize-energy/

I generally frown on subsidies as these only spur increased consumption, in a world of rapidly depleting resources. I prefer taxes as a means of redirecting consumer behaviors to more socially and environmentally responsible activities. There's nothing wrong with under-consuming in this world when everything is becoming scarcer! And taxes are needed from somewhere, the government needs to operate.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 08, 2011
Subscriber, the "scheme" to get precious metals out of the hands of ordinary people isn't simply an "old" one, it's a PERMANENT one.

The most recent chapter clearly goes back to World War I, when the banksters launched their "assault" on the silver-based economies of China and India.

Following that there was a saturation-level campaign of propaganda to INVENT a new "long-term gold/silver ratio". That's why you hear the most clueless of writers talking about a "long-term ratio" of 60:1 - the parrots have been trained well.

Your skepticism about re-introducing precious metals as money is thus understandable. While this process may end up being as slow as "erosion", it's also just as inevitable.

The ultra-wealthy have NEVER created a sustainable model for their stealing, because over thousands of years they have NEVER been able to restrain their stealing to ONLY 80% of a societies wealth. Thus it's not a question of "if" their latest chapter of oppression will end, only "when".

This is also what makes Salinas Price's proposal so utterly brilliant: it can be implemented AGAINST the wishes of bankers - because the only way they could explain/justify their opposition to such a move would be to REVEAL their stealing.

Otherwise there can be NO official reason for bankers to oppose the re-introduction of a "parallel currency". They must acquiesce or confess !!
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 08, 2011
SWS, disappointing to hear what India did, as they OBVIOUSLY didn't listen to Salinas Price's warning about the danger of giving silver (or gold) money a FIXED value versus paper.

ANY price they pegged the coins at today is too low - meaning that most will simply be melted down and re-refined.

Regarding silver stockpiles, I'm firmly convinced they were DELIBERATELY "destroyed" (i.e. consumed) by pushing the price of silver very low - and discouraging ANY recycling. Yes, this process can be completely reversed over time with higher prices: stimulating greater mine production, dramatically increasing recycling, and curtailing demand.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 08, 2011
Dlmaniac, here's another area where I have somewhat "flip-flopped". Originally I shared your position that there simply "isn't enough" silver around (ABOVE GROUND) to be able to use it as currency - around the world.

However, introducing it into a single economy (of moderate size) like Mexico is much more practical. Longer term, PRICE takes care of this problem - as much higher silver prices eat into other categories of demand, freeing up more for use as "money".

Much higher silver prices WILL lead to significantly greater silver mine production - further aiding the move toward equilibrium, and hopefully providing enough excess to BEGIN to rebuild global stockpiles.

So "no", the whole world could NOT immediately start using silver as their primary currency. However, there is enough to BEGIN the process.
0
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written by subscriber, March 08, 2011
The bankers took a long, long time to slowly move us from precious metal coin money to debt money. First they eliminated silver, one country at a time, then they took in the gold coins and replaced them with receipt-money, and finally by 1971 the transition to debt money without recourse was complete. This gave everyone time to forget the previous system and slowly get used to the new system.

So I wonder whether it will be necessary to move slowly back toward precious metal money to give all the economic systems time to adjust themselves. But I also wonder whether such a slow move could ever happen in reality, given that all the people at the top of the pyramid would oppose it.

Ultimately, it looks to me like a question of power. The move to debt money was clearly engineered from above by the wealthy and powerful. So how do we undo their system while they still retain power? Will it start one country at a time? Or even one state at a time (e.g. Utah)? Or will there have to be a general collapse to reveal to all the bankruptcy of debt money?
dlmaniac
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written by dlmaniac, March 08, 2011
@ swsprime

Quote: "...I'm afraid he might be too late, all the Silver he would need to do this is gone and has not been replaced by newly mined Silver because the artificially low price for Silver over many decades dictated that the stuff be left in the ground. It would take seven to ten years to work up enough new large Silver mines to fund a Silver currency, and that is if there is still enough in the ground to do so."

Silver is in urgent need of preservation. I think Jeff had an article or two before talking about the similar theme. Silver price will be driven to a level where the wasteful usage will choked off and it's worthy recycling it, perhaps 200$/Oz(in today's dollar value)? Monetizing silver might do the trick tho it's gonna be lot harder than re-monetizing gold.

I heard India just released a new set of 50% pure silver coins. They gave it a fixed value that is probably too low, tho.
swsprime
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written by swsprime, March 07, 2011
On the money Jeff.

Here's a few trivial historical facts about currency debasement:

The Germans and French came off the Gold Standard just before WW1 in order to be able to have a long war. Before that when Countries and Principalities fought each other they generally had to sue for peace after quite a short time as their money (Gold and Silver) ran out. In the case of Germany after WW1, the cost of the war and reparations to France caused the Mark to crash and eventually you needed a wheel barrow full of notes to buy a loaf of bread and if you dropped money, you didn't bother to pick it up - there's a German photo of the period with a street sweeper sweeping up money!

The Roman's were the first Super Power to devalue their currency by changing the precious metal content (Silver) of their currency (coins) from 100% to zilch over time in order to pay their soldiers and provide war materials for them, i.e. to make war longer. In a recent archeological dig in Colchester England of a Roman Amphitheater, the archeologists were astounded to find literally thousands of the same Roman coins just lying around - tossed away by the crowd - I wonder why they did that?

I myself am a one hundred trillion dollar millionaire. I bought the one hundred trillion dollar Zimbabwe note for $3.60 on eBay. About twenty years ago when Zimbabwe became independent one Zimbabwe dollar was worth $1.50. I would suggest that the only difference between Zimbabwe Government Finance and the American Government Finance is that Zimbabwe is ahead of the curve.

Hugo Salinas Price is right to pursue a Silver Currency for Mexico, but I'm afraid he might be too late, all the Silver he would need to do this is gone and has not been replaced by newly mined Silver because the artificially low price for Silver over many decades dictated that the stuff be left in the ground. It would take seven to ten years to work up enough new large Silver mines to fund a Silver currency, and that is if there is still enough in the ground to do so. I think Mr Price really doesn't have that time.

Declaration: The writer of this piece owns physical Silver and Silver Mining Stocks - and intends to own more quickly!

dlmaniac
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written by dlmaniac, March 07, 2011
Jeff,

What do you think of the massive industrial usage of silver? I think that usage is a problem to monetizing of silver as it makes it difficult to either set the price of silver or figure out the amount of supply with demand of it coming from so many different fields. It'd probably take a long time to both find the reasonable equilibrium price for silver and build up big enough stockpile for silver to be used as money.

Hugo Salinas proposes that people give silver coins an initial floating price and then revalue them higher (and higher only) once their melt price is legitimately higher than the previously given floating price. That way it makes silver a nice vehicle as storing of value.
Sanity Check
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written by Sanity Check, March 07, 2011
Well said, Jeff. One thing I'd like to add. It's not just the bankers who are at fault. It's also the mainstream economists. Almost to a man (or woman) they could care less about whether the dollar holds its value over the long run, and they absolute fear falling prices. The reason is that they equate falling prices with deflation. While it's true that deflation is often characterized by falling prices, it does not follow that falling prices imply deflation. Yet, equating the two is exactly what mainstream economists assume.
Jeff Nielson
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written by Jeff Nielson, March 07, 2011
Thanks Posthumous! But a large chunk of the credit goes to my "research team" - of which you are a MEMBER yourself (lol).

Yes, I could have added ANOTHER link or two for Hugo Salinas Price, since every time he speaks it's worth listening...
Posthumous
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written by Posthumous, March 07, 2011
Jeff you are a fanatical researcher sir...Thank You.
Just to repeat my link of Hugo Salinas Prices lecture at Londons Guild Hall just recently; He gives an explicit strategy for the progressive introduction of Silver Money into circulation.
http://www.cheviot.co.uk/sound...money[url]

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